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Rethink The Right To Be Forgotten
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RPMFortune
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RPMFortune,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/17/2014 | 7:46:16 PM
Re: Misguided Ruling at Best
Th UK "Rehabilitation of offenders Act 1974" already provides for this. Where a convicted person has completed their sentence, than after a defined period of time, the record is expunged. There are exceptions depending on the type of crime, for example, sex offences, and for a persons profession such as doctors or teachers. Search engines could be required to observe the provisions of this Act.
JohnN713
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JohnN713,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/17/2014 | 6:55:57 PM
LOL
....or that the De Rothschilds....jews....lended Hitler money in the 1930's to build germany's war machine........
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/17/2014 | 5:37:01 PM
Re: This is Crazy
Agreed, such a law can only be enforced if only a handful of search engines are operational. And I wonder how such a law could stop results from being displayed if users were sharing a news story on social media, that's being picked up by a search engine as organic interest.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/17/2014 | 5:26:55 PM
Re: Data Racket
I can see your reasoning and I think you made a good point about extortion. From the perspective of personal information ownership a different conclusion is drawn and from the perspective of social information ownership a different conclusion is drawn, for instance, if an individual is a neighbor to a con-artist (one that has managed to avoid the law) then the individual has a right to know about the activities of their neighbor in order to protect themselves, but if time has elapsed and their activities have changed (10 years, 20 years and so on) then, a lot of benefit is not provided to society by repeating irrelevant bygones.

Basically, it is complicated and I see it as a time-weightage problem -- one that needs to be addressed in such a manner that a good equilibrium point is found.
petell
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petell,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/17/2014 | 5:12:37 PM
No more witch hunts
The right to be forgotten will cause real social harm

Humanity has got by with the "harm" of not remembering every trivial detail about every human being for throusands of year. The new fashion, brought about by social media, is merely a vain "blip" in that long-help practice. It  only becomes necessary to demand the removal of personal information because what is out there is being misused so egregiously.


So yes, let's delete everything on the internet about every individual - with the possible exception of on-the-record data about people while they hold public office. It will make no difference to anyone except the terminally nosey, prying and insecure and will mean that we can go about our business without having every single comment being held up to scrutiny by self-appointed moral judges, who remove every shred of context in their quest for a McCarthy-style witch hunt against the whole world.
CristianA821
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CristianA821,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/17/2014 | 5:04:18 PM
wow. compelling argument
Imagine some sensitive info about you (not someone else, YOU!) is made public on the internet. Contacting the website directly to take it down does not work. How else can you make this unavailable? I mean if it appears when you Google your full name. Seriously, what other option do you have to take down this information?

 

I think that the argument that everyone has against the right to be forgotten is in fact the complacency and comfortableness of people being able to Google anything on anyone ELSE.

 

But if it were something about you out there, that would be really harmfull and that you would have no other way to take it down than having it removed from Google´s search results, you would change your opinion on the spot.

 

So please stop being hypocritical and try being emphatic for just a second.
cbjameson
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cbjameson,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/17/2014 | 4:39:06 PM
Right to Privacy and what Google remembers
Part of knowing what not to report in search results is remembering what not to report.  Of necessity, search engines will retain "secret" files of that information.  I'm not sure that's a good thing.

And, might the liability of search engines extend to the same information presented in images? in audio? other languages?

Right to Privacy is a good idea, but not a good law - one of many ideas in that category.
rbrband
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rbrband,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/17/2014 | 4:24:38 PM
Re: Re: Data Racket
Google is not merely a search engine anymore--it's also more than one OS (Chrome and Android)--and, so much more. (People may not have noticed recently: They complain that Microsoft is an easy hacker-target--so is Google (and likely IOS) now, too.)

Forget it!: First, I'd say to become a master of disguise: Attempt to fake your credentials and IDs. (That's easy enough--given how comically stupid and insecure they are--thanks to our national "Culture of Cheap! By the way, make the "Culture of Cheap" your best friend!)  

Desert your families--you don't need them--they don't need you!: Disappear--redo your lives--reappear! (Become a carpenter in a broken-down cabin deep in the woods, manage a nursery, a flower shop, a surf shop, or an apiary! Heck, become the next "Grizzly Adams"--help me set up my still in WNC! Herd some goats in Mexico! Make weird wooden stringed instruments and lutes--and, flutes! Walk the earth as "Caine" did in "Kung Fu!" "Use your minds creatively!" "Create your own reality!"  It's not that hard!: "Anything is possible!" Now, get right on it!
Andrew Binstock
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Andrew Binstock,
User Rank: Author
5/17/2014 | 3:34:08 PM
Omitting links is not tantamount to lying
"The right to forget appears to be an obligation to lie."

I don't see any equivalence of these two. There are many, many types of information that are not available to the public and yet we don't term them as lying:

- Sealed juvenile records (as you mentioned)

- Personnel records

- Health records

- Grand jury testimony

All of these contain important information that some segment of the population might have a strong interest in knowing. The fact that we can't access that information doesn't in any way suggest lying. It's not even misleading.

We have come to accept that in these matters, absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. We should always have that view of Google searches. 

 
Andrew Binstock
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Andrew Binstock,
User Rank: Author
5/17/2014 | 3:21:24 PM
Re: Data Racket
"Google isn't collecting data."

Have you never looked at a cached Web page on Google servers? In addition to caching the pages, the search engines contains the data chopped up into indexable segments that the search engine then uses to return results. Google very definitely collects data on the content it links to. 

"Are we saying Goofle is actually publishing the info?"

Yes. It's not terribly different than publishing a directory. Were hard-copy phone directories, which simply listed names and phone numbers, not published? The fact that it's links rather than phone numbers doesn't mean that the information is not published. 

 
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