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Microsoft Surface Pro 3: What's Missing
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DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
5/28/2014 | 5:49:07 PM
Re: It's more portable than a Macbook Air.
When going through the tablet verses laptop decision processes of course these products will be compared including Android and Chrome books just as you stated based on predominance of use.  Particularly since the MacBooks run MS Office, the usage comparisons will be made.  But the Surface Pro 3 will also be competing against other ultrabooks and tablets where a better comparison can be made.  Microsoft's real competition for the Surface Pro 3 is not Apple.  If Apple does bring to market a 12" product most likely I think it will be an iPad, then the Surface to iPad comparison can be made right on.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
5/28/2014 | 5:28:59 PM
Re: Surface Pro 3 missing pieces
It's quite hard to understand Microsoft's decision process of late.  Everything has a value based on features verses cost.  Microsoft's price points have not been in line with customers' value point (Win8 or Surface) making it hard for Microsoft to properly "guess" the market.  Very strange considering Microsoft trail blazed the marketing and product development processes for technology products.  They are running out of time to get it right at least on the hardware end.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/28/2014 | 5:08:43 PM
Re: It's more portable than a Macbook Air.
Interestingly, rumors have insisted for the last few months that Apple will launch some kind of 12-inch MacBook with a high-resolution screen, and possibly (and this sounds interesting/questionable, if true) an ARM-based processor. Apple's invested a bunch in sensors, so who knows... but it would be interesting.

As it is currently, I see your point about direct comparisons, but I think a number of people will end up choosing between the Surface Pro 3 and some kind of MacBook just because of marketing and similar pricing. So the comparison is also unavoidable. The Surface Pro 3 scales content such that you see 6% more on its 12-inch screen than you do on a 13-inch MacBook, and whereas I frankly find the 11-inch MacBook Air too small, the 12-inch Pro 3 seems fine. So I don't think screen size is necessarily a reason to invalidate comparisons.

But the comparisons are difficult for other reasons because the devices overlap and diverge in so many ways. The Surface Pro 3 will be awesome for certain use cases, especially with the pen, and can certainly function as a laptop. But for general users who don't care about convergence and just want a kickass laptop, the 13-inch MacBook Air is an excellent machine. If you're looking at the Surface as a light, thin laptop, rather than some kind of hybrid, it's very nice. But the high-end model costs as much as a MacBook Pro, and I don't think the Surface will match any of the MPs in power. The Pro 3's computing muscle compares better with the Air's, but again, if you're focused on laptop use, rather than hybridity, you have to think about OS X vs. Windows 8.1 too. The Surface has touch, but the MacBook's Track Pad provides a pretty great tactile experience. And so on.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/28/2014 | 4:38:35 PM
Re: Surface Pro 3 missing pieces
@DDURBIN1

That's a good point. Microsoft produced more first-generation Surfaces than it could sell, to paraphrase Steve Ballmer. I wonder if Microsoft, after taking that big write-down, pivoted to a much more cautious approach for second-gen orders. This shift in strategy, along with the inevitable supply chain growing pains Microsoft had to undergo, might have left some would-be customers high and dry. You're not the only person who wanted a premium Surface Pro 2 but couldn't order one. At face value, that suggests high demand. But the revenue numbers don't suggest Microsoft sold an overwhelming number of units. So either they're having supply chain problems, or they've deliberately constrained production in order to avoid earlier losses, or some combination of both? In any case, they just absorbed a bunch of manufacturing expertise with Nokia, which should lead to at least some economies of scale that benefit Surface.

Microsoft announced some Surface Pro 3 customers at launch, so they'll need to hit the ground running with their first shipment, unless they want average consumers to deal with three-month wait times. But I think Microsoft knows its has a better product this time, so hopefully they're prepared to deal with it.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
5/28/2014 | 12:43:57 PM
Re: Surface Pro 3 missing pieces
Agreed but what still remains is if Microsoft can deliver the product.  My business would have liked a Surface Pro 2 256GB version but none have ever been available since release and still waiting.  Not about to preorder the Surface Pro 3 256GB version when MS hasn't delivred the Surface Pro 2 version as yet.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
5/28/2014 | 12:34:37 PM
Re: It's more portable than a Macbook Air.
There is no 12" Macbook Air, its either 11" or 13", however its Microsoft that keeps compairing the Surface 3 to the Macbook Pro which still doesn't have a 12" model only 13" so direct comparison is kind of pointless,
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
5/28/2014 | 11:25:44 AM
Re: Lost Credibility

Actually Microsoft is the one doing the comparisons (so your credibility loss is with Microsoft not the author) while this author answers this with spot on deficiencies.

JFTechnologist
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JFTechnologist,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/22/2014 | 11:31:51 AM
Lost Credibility
This author lost all credibility with me at the affordability complaint.  This is not an iPad.  We are not talking about cortex A9 chips and a watered down app ecosystem.  This is a full Windows laptop stuffed into a tablet form factor. The $799 i3 model alone is more powerful than the latest iPad. Different devcies, different usecases, invalid comparison.
anon7006321113
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anon7006321113,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/21/2014 | 11:50:39 PM
Re: New Tablets
Another innovative tablet to launch this week is the Ramos i10 Pro ($399) which offers the first Dual-boot tablet on the market that makes it easy to use both Windows software and Android Apps.

The Ramos i10 Pro first premiered at CeBit 2014 at the Intel Showcase and offers a 10-inch, Full HD display, an Intel BayTrail 64-bit processor, Bluetooth 4.0, GPS, and a 8000 mAh battery with 9 hours battery life.

One source with more on the new Ramos i10 Pro multimedia device is -- i P r o T a b l et
telle quelle
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telle quelle,
User Rank: Strategist
5/21/2014 | 4:19:59 AM
Re: Microsoft's new strategy.
khodson, newsflash! The Surface OS is a full-blown Windows 8.1, you don't need to rely just on "apps" from the app store. But I think you knew that already. You just like trolling for red herrings, eh?
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