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Is It Time To Ask For A Raise?
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Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/23/2014 | 2:49:54 PM
Re: Blame the Boss
@alison: Thanks for sharing that article, it's a valid perspective on an issue that has no easy answers. I've definitely been met with some ridiculous responses in my own salary negotiations. When I was negotiating for a better salary at a job I was considering taking, i was later told the (male) CFO actually said to someone involved in the hiring process: Why is she asking for so much money when she has a husband.

The wildly inappropriate sexism inherent in that statement pretty much tells you all you need to know.

Nonetheless, in the face of that attitude, I was hired by the company -- and at an amount that was only marginally less than what I had originally asked for (which was fine with me b/c rule number one for prospective employees in salary negotiations is to never start with your lowest bid, of course, but to start with your highest bid).

 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/23/2014 | 2:42:57 PM
Re: Same problem, different reasons
@Laurianne: At the risk of sound too much like a self-help guru, I believe nobody takes advantage of us without our permission.

Women can (and should) work on bolstering their confidence and assertiveness.

Folks over 55 have a lot to offer from their years of experience and need to approach work from a positino of strength and confidence.

These days, layoffs are happening at every age group and everyone has to be prepared for them. In fact, recent research I saw out of Europe indicated that the unemployment rate was far higher for young people than it was for those in their 40s and 50s.

Likewise, according to the U.S. bureau of labor statistics, the annualized unemployment rate among those aged 25-34 is 7.4% compared with 5.3% for those aged 55-64.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/23/2014 | 2:36:00 PM
Re: Same problem, different reasons
@Lorna: I agree with you on both fronts--and in both cases I think people in these groups can learn to be proactive. Fear is a terrible foundation on which to build life decisions.

I encourage women of all ages to take classes in bolstering their negotiating skills. i've known female professionals who could negotiate the heck out of vendor contracts, but when it came to negotiating on behalf of themselves they could not do it.

As for the over-55 crowd, my feeling about asking for a raise is that if you never ask, you'll never know. In most cases the worst answer you'll get is "no" and I think most people feel that being turned down for a raise means they have to leave their job. That doesn't ahve to be the case. But if one doesn't even ask, the answer is always no, isn't it?
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/23/2014 | 12:47:37 PM
Blame the Boss
Let's not put all the blame on women here. How are women supposd to know what their male colleagues are making? Don't know about other non-managers, but I have little insight into how much other folks at my company make so I have no clue whether I'm making more, less, or the same as males or females with the same experience and level of responsiblities I've had over the years. Add to that, a strange mix of old and new digital titles across different organizations, and there's no way to measure it. Read a great column this morning by Kirsten Powers on the same vein: Blame Sexist Employers. Companies have the tools to know who's making what. I put it right on their shoulders.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/23/2014 | 9:38:44 AM
Re: Same problem, different reasons
Lorna is correct: Research across industries, not just IT, shows women ask for less in the first place, then ask for raises less often. As for the over 55 crowd, I think it is harder for them than anyone to ask for a raise. They can't risk being laid off because they fear longtime joblessness as a result.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
5/22/2014 | 12:22:30 PM
Same problem, different reasons
Not to generalize, but I bet most of the female-to-male gap is due to women not being willing to negotiate as toughly as men when being hired. Once you're in the door, raises are likely pretty comparable. But we often start out on an uneven footing.

Over 55? Likely worried demanding more money will lead your employer to think, "Maybe I can hire two 25-year-olds for that same figure ..."

 
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