Comments
IT Talent Retention Myths: Projects Don't Rule
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BruceHarpham
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BruceHarpham,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/5/2014 | 12:22:48 PM
Interesting talent/career findings
An interesting exploration of the talent needs and psychology of those in the field.

I liked the ending comment: "Yes, you can compete for top talent. Just remember to bring your checkbook."
impactnow
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50%
impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
6/9/2014 | 2:01:32 PM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
The results regarding the supervisor could be based on the wording I have met effective supervisors that were just terrible people managers. It really depends on how you perceive effectiveness. If the supervisor does their job day to day and fails to mentor and promote their employees are they effective? I have seen departments fail and departments fail based on their manager. I would not underestimate their daily impact.
SaneIT
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50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 7:12:01 AM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
I think it can be hard to identify a bad boss.  As you mentioned every boss has their own style and that is not always a bad thing.  Sometimes you can have great success with one group of people because your management style suits them and fail completely with another group because your style clashes with how they work best.  In this case what looks like a competent and successful manager can actually be a bad boss.  The really bad ones are obvious but the ones that take years for anyone to recognize can do much more damage than someone who is pulled from the position immediately.
Li Tan
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50%
Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 4:37:45 AM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
It's really hard to define what's a bad boss. The major responsibility of a boss is doing coorination for important things and communicating with different people. Each boss has his/her own characteristics and pros/cons. So it really depends on how boss and staff cooperate. For me the bad boss is a contributing factor to move forward but not the ultimate one.
SaneIT
50%
50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
5/27/2014 | 7:18:47 AM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
I know that many people that I worked with at the time left because of the bad boss.  I would think that the multiplier of one bad boss changing the attitude of dozens of employees would show up on a survey like this but I guess maybe my experience is far from normal.  I've had bosses who were lacking skills or had communication issues but overall I wouldn't say those ones would prompt me to leave.  The really bad one though is exactly why I walked away from what many people would consider a dream job in IT.
Brian.Dean
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50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/23/2014 | 8:21:40 PM
Re: Role Rotation
@Laurianne, that is a great point, the motivations behind finding "more interesting work" is largely influenced by the desire of a professional to find work that a computer or automation cannot achieve. Work that requires a lot of creativity and as long as AI do not progress in a meaning way, I take that there will be plenty of such opportunities available.
Brian.Dean
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50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/23/2014 | 8:11:18 PM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
It is nice to see that economics and the "Package" is the main driver behind IT professionals, individuals that have a desire to efficiently earn will indirectly also try to innovate more -- by tweaking a process here, trying something new, collecting information and insight, etc. The value that is created by this process -- creates an overall benefit to society.
Alison_Diana
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50%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/23/2014 | 12:42:57 PM
Re: Role Rotation
Working below potential and being unable to stretch are reasons IT pros may feel stymied in a position. If they are prevented from taking on new projects or are constantly overlooked for opportunities in new initiatives, they no doubt will feel undervalued and superfluous and will probably seek out a new employer who appreciates them. With so many organizations saying they cannot find well-qualified IT talent, it seems there are plenty of opportunities for motivated IT pros to move on.
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/23/2014 | 9:29:17 AM
Role Rotation
The 49% who cite "more interesting work" as a reason to find a new job probably includes some IT pros who worry that their current roles are heading for automation and thus lower headcounts. The ability to rotate into projects to learn new skills is a powerful retention tool.
ChrisMurphy
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0%
ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
5/23/2014 | 9:03:32 AM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
I suspect anyone who's had that horrible boss will be questioning the low ranking for supervisor. I've been lucky with bosses, but I don't take it for granted, and I'd have it on my priority list. Who you work with, the quality of colleagues both peers and supervisors, matters a lot. You're spending a lot of your life with them. 
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