Comments
IT Talent Retention Myths: Projects Don't Rule
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Gary_EL
IW Pick
100%
0%
Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2014 | 6:37:17 PM
Not too Surprising
After the excitment of college fades, the reality of paying off the student loans, the car and the mortgage set in. Soon enough, providing for the little "microprogrammers" will become the main concern in the lives of most people. What you aptly describe as the package becomes a lot more important than any pie-in-the sky, and most will take well-earned satisfaction in exercising their hard-won skills in overcoming the challenges involved in keeping the digital world reliably turning. It's a big part of growing up.
SaneIT
IW Pick
100%
0%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
5/23/2014 | 8:13:02 AM
I'm not all that surprised
The biggest surprise for me was that the capabilities for a manager is not important since I've had horrible bosses in the past and left jobs because I wasn't compensated enough to deal with that.  On the other hand I'm not at all surprised that  "bonus opportunities," "involvement in setting company strategy and goals," are not important because for me it either means more work with no guarantee that it will be worth my time and if it is part of my role to set company strategy and goals then it is just part of my job not an added benefit.  The issue of a prestigious company I can understand too because I have worked for both large and very visible companies and small companies, very little changes except that the average person recognizes the company you work for when it comes up in conversation.
ChrisMurphy
100%
0%
ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
5/23/2014 | 9:03:32 AM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
I suspect anyone who's had that horrible boss will be questioning the low ranking for supervisor. I've been lucky with bosses, but I don't take it for granted, and I'd have it on my priority list. Who you work with, the quality of colleagues both peers and supervisors, matters a lot. You're spending a lot of your life with them. 
Brian.Dean
50%
50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/23/2014 | 8:11:18 PM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
It is nice to see that economics and the "Package" is the main driver behind IT professionals, individuals that have a desire to efficiently earn will indirectly also try to innovate more -- by tweaking a process here, trying something new, collecting information and insight, etc. The value that is created by this process -- creates an overall benefit to society.
SaneIT
50%
50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
5/27/2014 | 7:18:47 AM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
I know that many people that I worked with at the time left because of the bad boss.  I would think that the multiplier of one bad boss changing the attitude of dozens of employees would show up on a survey like this but I guess maybe my experience is far from normal.  I've had bosses who were lacking skills or had communication issues but overall I wouldn't say those ones would prompt me to leave.  The really bad one though is exactly why I walked away from what many people would consider a dream job in IT.
Li Tan
50%
50%
Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 4:37:45 AM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
It's really hard to define what's a bad boss. The major responsibility of a boss is doing coorination for important things and communicating with different people. Each boss has his/her own characteristics and pros/cons. So it really depends on how boss and staff cooperate. For me the bad boss is a contributing factor to move forward but not the ultimate one.
SaneIT
50%
50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 7:12:01 AM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
I think it can be hard to identify a bad boss.  As you mentioned every boss has their own style and that is not always a bad thing.  Sometimes you can have great success with one group of people because your management style suits them and fail completely with another group because your style clashes with how they work best.  In this case what looks like a competent and successful manager can actually be a bad boss.  The really bad ones are obvious but the ones that take years for anyone to recognize can do much more damage than someone who is pulled from the position immediately.
impactnow
50%
50%
impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
6/9/2014 | 2:01:32 PM
Re: I'm not all that surprised
The results regarding the supervisor could be based on the wording I have met effective supervisors that were just terrible people managers. It really depends on how you perceive effectiveness. If the supervisor does their job day to day and fails to mentor and promote their employees are they effective? I have seen departments fail and departments fail based on their manager. I would not underestimate their daily impact.
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/23/2014 | 9:29:17 AM
Role Rotation
The 49% who cite "more interesting work" as a reason to find a new job probably includes some IT pros who worry that their current roles are heading for automation and thus lower headcounts. The ability to rotate into projects to learn new skills is a powerful retention tool.
Alison_Diana
50%
50%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/23/2014 | 12:42:57 PM
Re: Role Rotation
Working below potential and being unable to stretch are reasons IT pros may feel stymied in a position. If they are prevented from taking on new projects or are constantly overlooked for opportunities in new initiatives, they no doubt will feel undervalued and superfluous and will probably seek out a new employer who appreciates them. With so many organizations saying they cannot find well-qualified IT talent, it seems there are plenty of opportunities for motivated IT pros to move on.
Brian.Dean
50%
50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
5/23/2014 | 8:21:40 PM
Re: Role Rotation
@Laurianne, that is a great point, the motivations behind finding "more interesting work" is largely influenced by the desire of a professional to find work that a computer or automation cannot achieve. Work that requires a lot of creativity and as long as AI do not progress in a meaning way, I take that there will be plenty of such opportunities available.


IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
InformationWeek's IT Perception Survey seeks to quantify how IT thinks it's doing versus how the business really views IT's performance in delivering services - and, more important, powering innovation. Our results suggest IT leaders should worry less about whether they're getting enough resources and more about the relationships they have with business unit peers.
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