Comments
Feature Phones Almost Extinct In US
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mak63
50%
50%
mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
5/27/2014 | 11:49:25 PM
50 percent
I thought dumb phones do more than making calls. Anyhow, does anyone else find interesting that AT&T and Verizon have more than 50% of iPhones, while Sprint and t-mobile just about 30%?
Shane M. O'Neill
50%
50%
Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
5/27/2014 | 6:39:26 PM
Re: Spectrum
I can't say spectrum monopoly has discouraged smartphone innovation. At least not yet. Smartphones are evolving almost too fast. Think of the typical smartphone features now compared to five years ago. But at some point, data plan prices will become unsustainable. I don't mind paying the $90 a month because my smartphone is fun to use and a constant presence in my life and Verizon has great service where I live. But if innovation levels out and prices keep creeping up (likely because of tied up spectrum), I'll sing a different tune. I just haven't seen that yet.

 
jagibbons
50%
50%
jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
5/27/2014 | 1:29:29 PM
Re: The 13%
Good question about disposables. I would guess that a significant number of feature phones are disposables. That, and the Jitterbug for those less tech saavy.
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/27/2014 | 1:12:45 PM
The 13%
I wonder what portion of the 13% feature phones are disposables, the kind you use for a while and then dump.
Somedude8
100%
0%
Somedude8,
User Rank: Ninja
5/27/2014 | 11:53:30 AM
Re: Spectrum
I believe you are 100% correct.

Unfortunately I have little optimism about the FCC taking the consumer's side in such things with their current leadership. So my wife and I will probably have to continue to pay nearly $200/month for our two smart phones' plans.

There are of course cheaper secondary carriers, and other less featured options. But, with me working as a freelancer/consultant in IT, and my wife also working from home, trading some reliability for a cheaper rate just isn't an option for us.

So, somehow, the smart phone revolution has both freed and enslaved us.
Lorna Garey
100%
0%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
5/27/2014 | 10:35:18 AM
Spectrum
Now if the FCC would only get serious about freeing up spectrum in a way that will lower the cost of data plans and encourage innovation. I believe spectrum should be seen as a public resource that can be taken, by eminent domain if necessary, from private entities that are sitting on bandwidth. Meanwhile the FCC needs to be crystal clear about what will be offered in the upcoming auction and how it plans to let smaller providers have a shot at spectrum. 


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