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Internet Of Things: In Search Of An Architecture
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Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
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5/27/2014 | 2:55:57 PM
The Road to a Standard
When I first started my technical career, the Cold War was still raging, and the Military had a lot more influence on the direction of technology then it does today. If a standard was needed, they often provided it. Not so today. Standards seem to evolve, perking up from bottom to top rather than being set from above. The IOT is just beginning. It has a long, long way to go before there can be a standard. So, for the time being, it'll be the Wild West. Only the strong will survive long enough to have influence on the eventual standard
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
5/27/2014 | 7:09:20 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@Gary-EL There is something to that. I had a friend caught in that. Her first job after completing her engineering degree was for the military, but after a few years of teaching, she couldn't get the job back. The military had cut back a lot on its engineering. 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/27/2014 | 11:57:31 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@Ariella: it's unfrotunate, the military at one time was a major source of funding for engineering breakthroughs. Now that has fallen squarely on the shoulders of private industry.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
5/28/2014 | 8:11:28 AM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@snuyc yes. In fact, some of the biggest innovations in technology we hear about don't even originate in the US.
StaceyE
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StaceyE,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/30/2014 | 6:40:21 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@ Susan

Hopefully one day our military will be able to start putting funds back into things like engineering; instead of war.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/30/2014 | 6:47:37 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@StaceyE: That's a conundrum i struggle with on a personal level. I'm no proponent of war by a long stretch, but I have to acknowledge that many of the technologies and engineering innovations that shape our daily daily lives came about as a result of initially being developed by the military. Silicon Valley most likely wouldn't exist in its current form if it weren't for the defense spending that poured into this area in the 1950s and 1960s. So while I agree in principal that I would like to see more government spending on engineering that on military, I suspect that in reality the two are more tightly entwined than I'd care to think about.

 
StaceyE
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StaceyE,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/30/2014 | 7:20:05 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@ Susan

Very well said. I agree with your thoughts 100%.
batye
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batye,
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7/1/2014 | 6:43:46 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
I could not agree more... right on the point...
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/2/2014 | 1:00:05 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@Batye: Thank you kindly. 
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2014 | 9:22:31 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
thank you :)
StaceyE
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StaceyE,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2014 | 11:07:16 AM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@ Batye

Nobody wants war...but unfortunately it is sometimes necessary.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/2/2014 | 12:59:15 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@StacyE: Thanks so much. I guess the best we do is to become is optimistic realists.
StaceyE
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StaceyE,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2014 | 11:18:52 AM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@Susan

Optimism and realism are sometimes hard to have at the same time. But I would rather be optimistic than the alternative. :)
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/31/2014 | 12:58:45 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@StaceyE: Good attitude, i happen to agree. Most cynics are really optimists at heart. :)
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
8/3/2014 | 12:25:42 AM
Re: The Road to a Standard
yes, as everyone do hope things will work out one way or other...
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
7/1/2014 | 6:45:42 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
from my past... Military always get latest and greatest.... and first priority access to technology.... and no other way around it ....
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/2/2014 | 1:02:02 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@Batye: And often we do see the benefits of that R&D investment in our personal lives as well. i wish there were another way to do it, though. 
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2014 | 9:17:40 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
yes, you are right... as it does happens too often...
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
7/1/2014 | 6:47:44 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
interesting idea/point... but I think in our life time it would never happens... as for now we are entering age of permanet war... how I see...

 
StaceyE
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StaceyE,
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7/31/2014 | 11:08:50 AM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@ batye

Sadly I agree with you. It seems like with everything going on in the world we are at the brink of another world war...or another cold war....
batye
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batye,
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7/31/2014 | 12:58:24 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
yes as human nature... good and bad...
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/27/2014 | 11:55:49 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@Gary_EL: You're right, these days standards are decided based on which format wins the hearts and minds of consumers, not necessarily what is the best technology. Things that DO have pre-determined standards (the CD, WiFi) are now the exception rather than the rule.

While on the one hand this invites more opportunity for all players, on the other it does delay the ability for complex efforts, such as IoT, to really achieve their full potential. WE have only to look at the rapid advances made by cellular technology in countries that had a government standard, compared with the relatively slower growth in a country like the U.S. where there were multiple competing standards on the open market.

 
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
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5/28/2014 | 10:58:18 AM
Re: The Road to a Standard
One of the biggest issues I see with IoT is that the security protocols are still not in place.  So as these devices talk to each other, there is no way to ensure that the data that is being shared between devices is secured.  The threat of malware or devices which can listen in on these transmissions means that these feeds can be used to notify them of environmental triggers such as in the article, should you be returning home, instead of just notifying your home that you want the lights and music on, a home invader could use the information to understand your traffic patterns, or to give them notification to flee the house.  Before these devices can be built, security must be standardized to ensure that transmission between IoT is secure and able to be controlled so only data you wish to transmit to certain devices is transmitted.  This will only come if the actual platform is standardized.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/28/2014 | 7:30:43 PM
Re: The Road to a Standard
@Startustician: And those security concerns become even more frightening on a broader scale. Imagine IoT being used for SCADA to control, say, a nucelar power plant or the electric grid. The havoc could be catastrophic without security standars in place. And, even with security standards, as we've seen in other recent cases, there's always a way to crack it.

As exciting as the IoT future is in terms of possibilities, it is downright scary when you consider how  much more vulnerable these devices will make us all.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
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5/28/2014 | 7:49:53 AM
The IoST (Internet of Shared Things)
Susan, 

Interesting article. It let me thinking about a couple of things, for instance, the consumer example on the concept of the connected home. 

According to Sarma: "Let's say you want to change the experience when you walk into your home. The lights will come on, music will play, temperature will be set. Maybe Google Maps informs the house that you're near, and then a series of actions have to happen to anticipate your arrival."

And you said: "It all seems great, but what if it's not you walking into the house, but your spouse, who dislikes bright lighting, hates your music, and wants it to be cooler? Your spouse now has to change everything, making life more difficult than before." 

Sarma's example sounds pretty much to what one would expect to be quite normal in about five years' time. Maybe less. By quite normal I mean enough people living in this kind of smart hourse. 

Most likely Google knows the difference between you walking into the house and your spouse walking into the house. This means that there can't be any confusion about what music to play, what lights to switch on, or what temperature to set. 

As everything is programable it could be a good idea to have some shared options in case both walk into the house about the same time. 

Now, if your spouse hates your music, and likes all the opposite to what you like, how did you get married in the first place to someone who makes your life difficult because you don't share a thing and can't even agree on the setting of your shared smart house? :D (hypotetical situation) Now you see my point? :) 

I believe the IoT are here to stay. We have been discussing the IoT for years now. Some people will be more relunctant to accept it, as it always happens with every new thing that comes out in technology. 

Smart houses, smart cars, smart shopping malls, smart everything is what we will be experiencing soon. 

The cloud of things sounds pretty cool as well. As for having to update all the software, etc. very often, isn't that what we are doing now anyway? Technology is a snow ball that is only getting bigger and bigger and it's non-stoppable. :) 

I think that event and panel were pretty interesting. Thanks for bringing it here for the rest of us.  

-Susan
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/28/2014 | 7:27:16 PM
Re: The IoST (Internet of Shared Things)
@susanF: and off we go into the future that even the creators of The Jetsons could not have imagined.

As far as the consumer example goes, I think Sarna's point was that at some stage we'll get to where we don't have to even program any of those things, the system of systems that runs our lives will automatically know our tastes and desires based on analysis of various data about us. That, to me is the holy grail. I'm lazy, I don't want to program anything.

:)

As for taste in music being a test of a strong marriage, heh heh. My husband and I fight about music all the time, but it's usually along the lines of which 60s rock band had the best drummer.


The software updating needs are going to increase exponentially as we move along the IoT path. Frankly, I'm disappointed we're not farther along than we already are on the consumer front--I remember hearing about all these great ideas at the Consumer Electronics Show many many moons ago and it seems only now that we're getting to the point where we can talk about this as being commonplace in the near(ish) future.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
5/29/2014 | 3:51:53 AM
Re: The IoST (Internet of Shared Things)
SusanN, :D  

I was precisely thinking of The Jetsons when reading your article. :) 

" ... the system of systems that runs our lives will automatically know our tastes and desires based on analysis of various data about us." 

Well, I don't consider myself lazy, but as the available time when I am awake is so limited and I can't sleep less than what I sleep I have to prioritize how to use my time. This means that programming things is rarely a top priority. Maybe it should be? :/ 

So, for this reason, having a system of systems running my life and programming everything for me sounds like heaven. :D Think of this: 

You program only one thing: The device that wakes you up, or, in my case, the time when you want to start your day. When that device goes off it tells your coffee or tea maker to start. There is a kitchen AI making your beakfast, your shower starts so when you step into it it's all nice and warm, etc. So, your day flows beautifully and you can spend your time doing what no one -yet- can do for your: Your brain work, your creations, your research, your writing. :)

Of course, all this brings us to see the importance of ethical and efficent data collection, good use and analysis of that data, and its useful applications in both consumer and enterprise worlds.

As for the best drummer discussion, probably the one who is right is the one who thinks Ringo Star was. :D 

"I'm disappointed we're not farther along than we already are on the consumer front--I remember hearing about all these great ideas at the Consumer Electronics Show many many moons ago ... " 

Indeed. I am disappointed, too. I want to experience all the wonderful technology we are discussing in my life time.

Oops. Sorry for the long comment. This article was really inspiring and I love all the discussing around the IoT. :) 

I do hope that near(ish) future is soon enough. 

-Susan 

 

 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/4/2014 | 7:28:55 PM
Re: The IoST (Internet of Shared Things)
@SusanF: I want this scenario you have outlined to be available to me now:

You program only one thing: The device that wakes you up, or, in my case, the time when you want to start your day. When that device goes off it tells your coffee or tea maker to start. There is a kitchen AI making your beakfast, your shower starts so when you step into it it's all nice and warm, etc. So, your day flows beautifully and you can spend your time doing what no one -yet- can do for your: Your brain work, your creations, your research, your writing.

While that sounds like it would make my life so much more manageable, i really do worry about security and privacy. Let's face it, we can't even manage to keep our personal data from being compromised now (Target hack, thank you very much!). I wonder, though, if the sheer volume of informatio about us and our lives in the IoT will become so much that it actually makes the hackers' jobs too difficult.

I know that sounds rather silly, but think about it this way: When you're walking home  late at night, the coventional wisdom is that you are safer in a group than by yourself. LIkewise, perhaps, IoT will unleash such a tidal wave of information that it will become every more difficult for hackers and criminals to isolate the data that really matters to them...

Surely, it won't be my taste in music that they are after.

:)
Pablo Valerio
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Pablo Valerio,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/29/2014 | 11:22:17 AM
Design is very important
Susan,

Paul Walborsky, CEO of Gigaom, gave a keynote speech this morning in the Barcelona Digital Global Congress. He was mainly talking about IoT and sensors and one of the things I remember most about his talk is when he said that Google paid that much money for Nest because of their design.

I do agree with that assesment. While the lack of clear standards is one the important barriers for the mass adoption of IoT, a clear and simple design is important for people's adoption.

The same way that people like some products, such as the iPhone, because it is powerful but also easy to use, we need the same concept on wearables and other home devices.
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 2:45:31 AM
Re: Design is very important
yes, with internet of things we gonna see this technology develops more and more... coming to our homes for everyday use...
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/4/2014 | 7:33:55 PM
Re: Design is very important
@batye: what do you hope the internet of things will do to make your home life easier?
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
6/13/2014 | 3:52:34 PM
Re: Design is very important
Susan... thanks God I have a wife... to control my Nest :) manualy :)...
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/13/2014 | 4:17:29 PM
Re: Design is very important
@Batye: haha! I could use one of those, too. :)
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
6/13/2014 | 4:22:10 PM
Re: Design is very important
My wife - she have Jamaican blood line... and after she fixes nest... she always say... slavery been abolished long time ago... and on day she will take a frying pan... and give nest what it deserves... as a free woman...
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Moderator
6/15/2014 | 8:26:48 PM
Re: Design is very important
I like the idea of having an experience or atmosphere created for you before walking in the front door. I would like to be able to program it on different settings for different moods. For example, if I wanted to cheer up, I would program Happy by Pharrell or Blurred Lines by Robin Thicke to play when I walked in the door. If I needed to calm myself down, I would like the lights dim when I walked in the from door with Celine Dion playing.
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
6/15/2014 | 10:45:50 PM
Re: Design is very important
interesting idea... it would soon gonna be reality I hope :)
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/4/2014 | 7:33:11 PM
Re: Design is very important
@Pablo: Good dispatch you have there from the Barcelona Digital Global Congress. How many products or applications have we seen fall by the wayside over the years because of poor user interface. Paul Walborsky is right on the money with that one. I am not even sure I can envision what type of user interface I would want to see for, say, my "home of the future."

How do you think the interface should look/feel/operate? Should it be tablet-controlled? Touch/heat senesitive? Voice activated?
Pablo Valerio
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Pablo Valerio,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/5/2014 | 4:18:47 AM
Re: Design is very important
Susan, I believe Apple is into something with the Home Kit! People do not want another diffiuclt device to learn and manage.

We are at crossroads with a new wave of connected devices being offered and no easy way to control them. My Samsung Smart TV is a nightmare to operate, so I don't have it connected to the network.
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
6/13/2014 | 3:51:36 PM
Re: Design is very important
yes, Pablo, I heard something simular about Apple... 
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 6:03:29 PM
Security
>> The biggest IoT challenge, according to Professor Sanjay Sarma of MIT, is the lack of an overarching architecture to pull together myriad streams of IoT information into a flexible and responsive ecosystem of applications.

If we can't figure out how to make security air tight, then perhaps architecture isn't our biggest issue. Unless we are prepared for people to break into our networked kitchen faucets and mess with the water.
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 8:03:18 PM
Re: Security
interesting observation/point... I trust you are right ...
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/4/2014 | 7:41:05 PM
Re: Security
@Jastro: I see security & architecture going hand-in-hand, really, Without standards it will be difficult to resolve the many security concerns raised by IoT. You're right to sound the alarm on the security issues--how any of this could ever be airtight is beyond my ability to imagine. We can't even keep our information secure and safe now. The thought that my neighbor's teenager might hack my water faucet and prank me with an unexpected shower is less concerning to me than the use of IoT in SCADA design, leading to potential vulneratilbites in the power grid and water systems for entire regions or countries.

Makes me want to grab my tinfoil hat and head to the bunkers.
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 7:58:19 PM
Re: Design is very important
I think we gonna see new shift of technology as internet of things get developed more and more...
Pieterv682
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Pieterv682,
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6/2/2014 | 8:14:13 PM
It also needs to fit with processes and Enterprise Architecture

I have to agree with Chris Kuntz, of ThingWorx who related the home scenario to business. "People understand it's not just about connecting your product, connecting your smart thing, collecting that data. It's about how do you connect it with a business process to effect some sort of change."

We understand the security challenges with IoT and the lack of standards. As IoT adoption increases standards with be developed and implemented. It is the natural evolution of technology adoption processes.

What is equally important is to consider how IoT fits in the Enterprise Architecture and as Chris mentions "how do you connect it with a business process to effect some sort of change". There is a lot of hype around smart devices and big data, but the real value will be realized when it is wired into the operational processes of a business. Adoption (and funding) of IoT will be accelerated when organizations can "listen" for key business events from sensors, "decide" if an intervention is required and "act" in a timely and appropriate manner to these key business events.

This requires that IoT becomes part of the Enterprise Architecture that considers the data from these devices, the other systems that it interacts with and the processes that manages the interventions and actions from the information that we gather from these devices.

Our experience with mature Fortune 10 companies who use smart devices in M2M and Operational Technology (OT) scenarios show that standards will emerge but considering how to create operational benefits from these devices and big data requires some Enterprise Architecture thinking as well.

IoT will also require some thought to manage the operational process applications that deliver the benefit from the devices, and not just applications that manage the devices itself. As Chris said, it is estimated that it will require around 5 to 10 million applications to support the billions of devices to deliver business value. The architecture needs to be extended not just to the IoT devices, but to how it fits into the enterprise and its processes.

Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/4/2014 | 7:45:55 PM
Re: It also needs to fit with processes and Enterprise Architecture
@Pieterv682: What you're basically saying is that it's not just HOW we gather all this information, but WHAT we do with it that is really going to be the driver for IoT...and in that sense it's a technology that's also in search of a business model or, if you'll forgive the old-school phrase, a "killer app." Or, in this case, a killer ecosystem of apps might be more appropos.

in regards to your comment here: The architecture needs to be extended not just to the IoT devices, but to how it fits into the enterprise and its processes

I have a few questions for you and for all the folks in the community who are partitipating in this conversation:

--what do you see as the greatest obstacle to extending IoT data into the enterpriese & enterprise processes?

--what is the business model that would make investing in IoT worthwhile?

--Who in the organization needs to have a seat at the table in planning out how to design for IoT?

 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/4/2014 | 7:37:31 PM
Re: Design is very important
@mdmconsult: There's a lot of good work being done around Bluetooth & also next-gen WiFi. You raise a good question: What does the IoT network look like? We've got Bluetooth, WiFi and Cellular m2m devices out there already--which serves our needs, or will we always require some combination of all three (or something completely new?).

And--where will all this wireless bandwitch come from to bring IoT to every home and office and car?
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
6/17/2014 | 7:00:03 PM
Internet Of Things: In Search Of An Architecture
I totally sympathize with the panelists on this one. We're looking at a future that we're all getting excited about, but that we haven't really mapped yet. We're going to have a fridge that can tell us when we're out of groceries, a thermostat that we can control with our smartphones, and lighting system that responds to weather conditions - but are they all going to talk to each other? If so, how? The need for standards and best practices it certainly there, and one could build a career off of being an IoT expert in the coming years.

At the same time, though, isn't suggesting that there will be uniform standards (and communication between) devices made by different manufacturers (sometimes competing ones) from all over the world a bit of a pipe dream? I would love to have my fridge and my thermostat communicate to set up an ideal temperature based on what I'm cooking tonight, and maybe they will - if they're both made by GE. Of course, there's a little more to it than that, and the implications are different in the business world, but at the end of the day, I don't think we should expect companies to break down their silos just because it's best for the customer. Maybe standards is all we'll get.

Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
6/18/2014 | 2:37:25 AM
Re: Internet Of Things: In Search Of An Architecture
While I am intrigued by the IoT,  I still feel it to be somewhat intrusive.  What if I don't want to be a part of this ecosystem ?  Whether it is labeled Google,  Apple or MS.   There has to be a easier way of opting out of these constructs.

But as soon as you buy a mac, they want you to backup your pictures up in their servers, and it just goes on and on.   This is just one example of course but this kind of pushing just alienates those of us who simply want to enjoy our computing experience.  

Some will argue this ( IoT) will enhance this - but as with everything, it is the execution that counts.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
6/18/2014 | 2:45:08 AM
Re: Internet Of Things: In Search Of An Architecture
I don't think we should expect companies to break down their silos just because it's best for the customer. Maybe standards is all we'll get.


@zerox203    Not sure what you mean by silos in this instance, but I agree standards would be a great boon towards  enabling IoT to take place in a orderly fashion.    I think most products out today will be seen as ancient if standards become a reality.   But realistically, there probabaly isn't anything happening soon in this area of unified standards, most are in a race to get this technology out there and just get into the game.  

Maybe this is what you mean by silos ?
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
6/19/2014 | 10:47:10 AM
Re: Internet Of Things: In Search Of An Architecture
@Technocrati

Maybe 'Silos' wasn't exactly the best choice of words. When we say 'silos' in a business context, we're usually talking about departments breaking themselves off and acting isolated from the rest of the business. Now, much has been said about how bad that is for business in the modern world, where everyone ought to be moving at a quick pace and decisions that affect the whole business ought to be made agily. I think, moving forward, that applies not just to departments within one business, but companies working in the same sector as well, and I'll explain why.

Susan is highlighting here the very real need for standards and architecture in the 'internet of things'. What does that really mean, though? Saying that two internet-connected items should capture, parse, and store their data in a way that is somehow uniform (so they can share data and talk to each other). That sounds great - for us. What if your competitor makes the other device? Nevermind going out of your way to cordon your data off from them, are you going to go out of your way to give it to them? I hope in the long term, companies will see that it's better for the whole business ecosystem to adopt some standards (just like cell phone chargers and memory cards), but in the short term, I think we'll be looking at a lot of non-sharing devices.
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
7/1/2014 | 6:49:24 PM
Re: Internet Of Things: In Search Of An Architecture
same as IT security it never ending battle of competition... and it like free for all this days... sad reality of technology development... how I see it...
kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Moderator
6/19/2014 | 10:47:09 AM
So my phone gets a second life?
I find it both facinating and a little creepy that my applainces are going to go into the cloud and talk to each other. I can imagine it now, my fridge sensor notes the milk is a little light, which tells my phone to go get more milk, but my phone is busy playing candy crush, no wait.. that's me. I always have this sense that my things are going to start nagging me when they all get 'smart' , then what happens when they start talking to one another, an appliance initiated intervention?
batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
7/1/2014 | 6:51:09 PM
Re: So my phone gets a second life?
sad but true, we are no longer have privacy nor security... even with our phone... what we owned... or it just a rent of new technology in exchange of having no right to privacy....


The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
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InformationWeek Tech Digest - August 20, 2014
CIOs need people who know the ins and outs of cloud software stacks and security, and, most of all, can break through cultural resistance.
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