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Healthcare IT Security Worse Than Retail, Study Says
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Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
7/31/2014 | 4:34:32 PM
Re: healthcare security
That's really great to hear, @SarahBeene. You almost wish there was a Good Housekeeping seal for practices! Sounds as though you'd be on the list!
HudnallsHuddle
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HudnallsHuddle,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2014 | 3:55:19 PM
Headlines and a Sacrificial Lamb are Coming Soon
Leaving security out of the plan to implement these networks and shared partient information is a short sided view to the HealthIT transformation many have underway. Encryption is not the silver bullet to protecting patient information. HealthIT organizations mus be diligent in monitoring behavior, access, use, etc. in order to put the meat behind a meaningful use attestation. I'm quite surprised CFO's are not more stringent in these organizations as they are the ones facing personal charges of fraud. This has gotten personal and not just corporate fines. I believe this is a ticking time bomb ripe to explode. Read more here > http://bit.ly/1zapjjn

 

@HudnallsHuddle
SarahBeene
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SarahBeene,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/10/2014 | 9:29:59 AM
Re: healthcare security
I'm well and truly on the encryption bandwagon! As the owner of a small practice, I am frantically aware of the complications and risks of handling patients PHI. I appreciate the volume of data we handle isn't as as high as the Standard & Poor 500 firms used by BitSight in their study, however studies like this always worry me. We want to be able to reassure our patients as I would hate to think they would hold details back out of worry, especially if it is detrimental to their health.

I have tried to eliminate as many manual processes as possible to keep everything water-tight, using cloud services like sfax as they have ensured HIPAA compliancy. Although as Michael Raggo has said, human error can cause breaches, and I doubt we'll ever be able to fully protect people from that. For now I'm going to keep encrypting all PHI, especially when shared with other departments!
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
6/9/2014 | 10:26:50 AM
Re: PHI Hack Coming to You Very Soon
You're exactly right: PHI will be hacked and the fact that the government is moving toward a centarlized database of healthcare records and the possible creation of a healthcare ID number should send alarm bells off. When you have studies demonstrating that healthcare, as an industry, is far less secure than the notably insecure retail market, we should be extremely worried. I don't think we're being alarmist when we say this will have much more dire implications than financial fraud.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
6/6/2014 | 6:10:42 PM
PHI Hack Coming to You Very Soon
Boyer believes the latest Target breach was a "watershed" event?  Evidently, he missed the other two breaches perpetrated inside of three years at Target in addition to the 867,292,654 (and counting) million records breached (that are known) compiled by the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.  Hacked PHI isn't an IF as much as it is a WHEN, and, when it does happen, consumers can expect the same hemming/hawing and blowing off of the event by both industry as well the lapdog government that continues to look the other way.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
6/2/2014 | 4:04:55 PM
Re: Watch Out, Finance?
You raise great points, @AmandaInMotion, in that perhaps finance isn't a great bastion of security; it's just less bad than the other verticals in the study. After all, banks get hacked and as you say, the NSA has its fingers in just about every pie. 

Personally, I'm concerned about healthcare data and lack of privacy. Almost every day I get a press release touting the use of "anonymized" data by one company, research firm, or university -- and that's data coming from doctors, hospitals, insurance firms, or government. In other words, it's patient data but I don't recall ever agreeing (or disagreeing) to allowing my data to be used in this way. Nor do I know anything about the standards used or not used or what happens when some of these companies go out of business. When my daughter started middle school, I discovered there's a central database where schools can look up kids' vaccinations. The IRS oversees health insurance coverage. And companies troll social media for mentions of individuals' medical complaints, treatments, and symptoms. 
AmandaInMotion
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AmandaInMotion,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/2/2014 | 12:07:53 PM
Re: Watch Out, Finance?
I don't know that the establishment finance world is much more terribly secure. All of us are at risk of spying and hacking from both government and non-government actors alike. It's a little lengthy, but this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtQ7LNeC8Cs) by Jacob Applebaum, writer at Der Spiegel, explains how the NSA has deliberately made the Internet a less secure place to be over the years. It blew my mind.

Allow me a moment to be trite and say, "It didn't have to be this way." I just think of all the people who need routine healthcare (http://tinyurl.com/oa65dqu) or the people headed into retirement. 

I gain hope, however, in believing that the system really will be so inefficient - like the disgraced VA hospitals - that private alternatives will pop up left and right. They'll have to, otherwise most of us will literally be left with Soviet-quality "health care".
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/30/2014 | 10:07:34 AM
Watch Out, Finance?
Do you think healthcare organizations will become more likely to try and recruit security professionals from finance? Or is healthcare too specialized, their budgets too tight (compared with finance) for this approach to work?
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/30/2014 | 10:05:02 AM
Re: Why ever store credit card numbers?
@Jon, I believe you're correct about those stolen CC numbers. This report didn't get into how healthcare data is being stolen. Information from HHS seems to indicate most is taken due to lack of encryption when hardware -- laptops, smartphones, etc. -- get stolen or lost. But this report suggests healthcare organizations WILL be attacked in a much more organized fashion. And if/when that happens, the general lack of preparedness will lead to a huge loss of personal health information, much bigger than anything we have yet seen from the world of retail.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/30/2014 | 10:01:51 AM
Re: healthcare security
How can vendors make their systems more secure, @moarsauce123? Do you think they should automatically encrypt all data, for example? Do you know of any vendors who are doing a better job than others?
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