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Pizza & Leadership: 4 Lessons
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David Wagner
IW Pick
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 7:01:27 PM
Re: Nice comparison, but ...
Dave Wagner has hit on a new golden rule of management, IMHO: Treat eveveryone as if you want them to buy you a pizza. 


Thanks! Maybe I should sell it as a t-shirt. :)
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 6:59:56 PM
Re: "thank you"
@snunyc- I suspect that isn't only a woman thing. I have an intense need to be liked, and I struggle when I have to make the unpopular call. I do it, but I hate it. 

But I do think it is a "nice person" thing and I think society has long given men more permission to be jerks. 

But walking the line between friend and manager is always going to be a very real issue for any real person. 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 6:59:03 PM
Re: Nice comparison, but ...
@Dave: you mean like how every politician likes to tell the story of how they were raised in a log cabin? Because they think it will make them more relatable to the general public?

:)
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 6:57:07 PM
Re: "thank you"
@alison- Personally, I'd like the parade. :)

No seriously, I agree with you. There's nothing worse than a boss that treats you like you don't matter. Go through the motions, at least. So out of curiosity, what means more to you-- the actual words "thank you" or some other sign of gratitide? Personally, I prefer "job well done" or specific compliments. But maybe I have too much of an ego.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 6:55:35 PM
Re: "thank you"
@cafzall: I like the idea of a "Thank You Culture" that should be a standard in every organization.

It's interesting to me what you say about "picking people for management-level positions that aren't only successful in handling the tactical aspects of their job, but are also people you actually like working for."

one of the things I've struggled with as a woman and as a manager is the incliniation to want to be "liked" in the workplace. i certainly want to be one of those managers that people like working for, though it has taken me some practice to realize that does not mean that everyone who works for me has to like me all the time.

I don't know if this is a particular challenge for me personally, for female managers in general, or if everyone learning to manage teams has work to overcome this tendency...

Thoughts?
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 6:49:01 PM
Re: Nice comparison, but ...
@Rob: I don't see the two as mutually exclusive. Maybe "be one of the gang" isn't exactly the right way to phrase it--it's more about being your authentic self and above all else being human. Those leaders who truly inspire others to do their best are, in my experience, the ones who are able to show their true, authentic selves in the workplace, and strive to treat their employees with compassion and respect. In my experience, those who do that have it come back to them in spades, even in times when they have to make the tough decisions that will make some team members unhappy.

Taking this line of thinking further, even those leaders who are considered "difficult" (Steve Jobs) show their authentic selves for better or worse.

Where I have seen leaders run into toruble is when they behave the way they think managers are "supposed" to behave, or according to what's in some kind of Management 101 handbook.

To thine own self be true...

 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 6:42:08 PM
Re: Nice comparison, but ...
@DavidC: Ha! and don't forget the beer...

Dave Wagner has hit on a new golden rule of management, IMHO: Treat eveveryone as if you want them to buy you a pizza.

I've definitely had bosses in past jobs who operated under a different philosophy: Treat everyone as if you want them to buy you a straitjacket.

;)

 
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
5/30/2014 | 6:02:26 PM
Re: Pizza and leadership: the unmentioned rule
@Charlie, I've heard the same "two pizza" rule of thumb applies at Amazon.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/30/2014 | 5:25:52 PM
Re: "thank you"
I've worked for two bosses who never said "thank you." It was difficult to work in that environment all the time. Needless to say, it's much easier to be productive when you know someone occasionally notices your efforts. Not looking for a parade, but a "well done" or "thanks" once in a while goes a long way.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 5:17:25 PM
Re: Pizza and leadership: the unmentioned rule
@Charlie- Wow, that's really interesting. I've known some developers who can really pack away the pizza though. That might mean teams of one. :)

Seriously though, I really like the strategy because it implies at the heart of it that a team is going to need to meet over pizza and long hours at some point and they need to know how to keep that team together. 
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