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Pizza & Leadership: 4 Lessons
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Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2014 | 11:45:43 AM
Looking forward to lunch
I have worked for some thankless bosses and some who were sure to say thank you. The thankless crowd were an odd breed. They would occasionally order pizza for the whole office or barbecue as a way to say thanks. Any other times during the year were brutal. Hard work was seldom rewarded. It was a tough place to be all day.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 7:49:21 PM
Re: "thank you"
@snunyc- Crazy. The craziest part is that I suspect that the company thought people should have been MORE grateful they got a paycut and not a pink slip rather than 10% less grateful.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 7:17:35 PM
Re: "thank you"
@Alison: Hear hear! I don't really get why so many organizations are such "thankless" cultures. I worked at one privately held organization many years ago where the attitude among senior managers was just as Dave said in his post: Your salary is thanks enough, be grateful for it. Only at this company, the added insult to the injury was: And, oh, by the way, we're instituting 10% blanket pay cuts for everyone (except the c-suite) effective next payday. The very next day, the company's CFO had a brand new Audi delivered to the office parking lot on a flatbed truck and we later learned the comapny was paying the lease for that vehicle as his reward for being such a good cost cutter.

True story.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 7:16:51 PM
Re: Pizza and leadership: the unmentioned rule
The idea here is basically that the organization is made up of "cells" of no more than, say, 8 people (assuming 8 slices per pie, two slices per person)? Surely at some point they must have to meet on a larger scale...

I noticed Charlie said development teams and not just teams. I suspect they have bigger teams in other depasrtments. It seems reasonable to imagine that in development teams where agility is needed and where work can be divided.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 7:03:42 PM
Re: Pizza and leadership: the unmentioned rule
@Charlie: And, apparently, they enjoy short lines for a slice of pizza...

That is fascinating, and sensible. I'm having trouble imagining how that can possibly scale -- which shows the limits of my imagination, not the limits of the concept.

The idea here is basically that the organization is made up of "cells" of no more than, say, 8 people (assuming 8 slices per pie, two slices per person)? Surely at some point they must have to meet on a larger scale...

 

 
David Wagner
IW Pick
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 7:01:27 PM
Re: Nice comparison, but ...
Dave Wagner has hit on a new golden rule of management, IMHO: Treat eveveryone as if you want them to buy you a pizza. 


Thanks! Maybe I should sell it as a t-shirt. :)
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 6:59:56 PM
Re: "thank you"
@snunyc- I suspect that isn't only a woman thing. I have an intense need to be liked, and I struggle when I have to make the unpopular call. I do it, but I hate it. 

But I do think it is a "nice person" thing and I think society has long given men more permission to be jerks. 

But walking the line between friend and manager is always going to be a very real issue for any real person. 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 6:59:03 PM
Re: Nice comparison, but ...
@Dave: you mean like how every politician likes to tell the story of how they were raised in a log cabin? Because they think it will make them more relatable to the general public?

:)
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 6:57:07 PM
Re: "thank you"
@alison- Personally, I'd like the parade. :)

No seriously, I agree with you. There's nothing worse than a boss that treats you like you don't matter. Go through the motions, at least. So out of curiosity, what means more to you-- the actual words "thank you" or some other sign of gratitide? Personally, I prefer "job well done" or specific compliments. But maybe I have too much of an ego.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 6:55:35 PM
Re: "thank you"
@cafzall: I like the idea of a "Thank You Culture" that should be a standard in every organization.

It's interesting to me what you say about "picking people for management-level positions that aren't only successful in handling the tactical aspects of their job, but are also people you actually like working for."

one of the things I've struggled with as a woman and as a manager is the incliniation to want to be "liked" in the workplace. i certainly want to be one of those managers that people like working for, though it has taken me some practice to realize that does not mean that everyone who works for me has to like me all the time.

I don't know if this is a particular challenge for me personally, for female managers in general, or if everyone learning to manage teams has work to overcome this tendency...

Thoughts?
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