Comments
Pizza & Leadership: 4 Lessons
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 9 / 11   >   >>
batye
50%
50%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 2:00:01 AM
Re: "thank you"
it sad reality of new corporate env... but we are living in new age... everything is in the rush... to get to dead line... and forget humanity...
batye
50%
50%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 1:57:52 AM
Re: Looking forward to lunch
I do not know... but most of the time I look at this problem... I'm here to work and get my paycheck... and nothing else matter... if I get thanks or not... I'm here to work and do my best...
batye
50%
50%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 1:56:02 AM
Re: Show evidence of need
interesting observation... but it all depends on many factors in play... including office politics...
moarsauce123
0%
100%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
6/1/2014 | 1:14:39 PM
Show evidence of need
That should not apply only to the work that needs to be done, but also, or even more especially to needing everyone on the team. Every team member ideally sees her or his contribution as needed. It is not enough to listen to experts on the team and the decide constantly against what they say. I am on a team like that where I try hard to make valuable contributions to quality just to have all ta shot down in favor of cramming more features in. While I'd still buy my boss and the product owner a pizza, it is that they are nice people, but not because of their business decisions.
Susan Fourtané
0%
100%
Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
6/1/2014 | 10:55:14 AM
Be one of the gang
Dave, 

I would put being one of the gang in the first place and all the other three will come along easier. When the leader of the team camouflages with the gang it's easier for the team to go the extra mile to complete a deadline that was due three weeks ago.  

Showing the way with the example, being positive, motivational and inspiring. Adding some incentives whenever there is an extra task to complete always helps.

-Susan 

P.S. FYI, before reading your article I had to go and get myself a pizza to be my Sunday reading snack, because this week seems to have been pizza week with business or cybersecurity toppings and I couldn't resist any longer. :D 

 
PedroGonzales
50%
50%
PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
5/31/2014 | 12:29:50 PM
Re: "thank you"
such stories can have negative consequences because it demolarize people.  I think many bosses lost their humanity.  Fortunately, my last boss was very polite with me every time I did a good job she said thank you.  Sometimes, saying thank you or congratulating a person for a good job is very meaningful.
Michelle
50%
50%
Michelle,
User Rank: Strategist
5/31/2014 | 11:45:43 AM
Looking forward to lunch
I have worked for some thankless bosses and some who were sure to say thank you. The thankless crowd were an odd breed. They would occasionally order pizza for the whole office or barbecue as a way to say thanks. Any other times during the year were brutal. Hard work was seldom rewarded. It was a tough place to be all day.
David Wagner
50%
50%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 7:49:21 PM
Re: "thank you"
@snunyc- Crazy. The craziest part is that I suspect that the company thought people should have been MORE grateful they got a paycut and not a pink slip rather than 10% less grateful.
Susan_Nunziata
50%
50%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 7:17:35 PM
Re: "thank you"
@Alison: Hear hear! I don't really get why so many organizations are such "thankless" cultures. I worked at one privately held organization many years ago where the attitude among senior managers was just as Dave said in his post: Your salary is thanks enough, be grateful for it. Only at this company, the added insult to the injury was: And, oh, by the way, we're instituting 10% blanket pay cuts for everyone (except the c-suite) effective next payday. The very next day, the company's CFO had a brand new Audi delivered to the office parking lot on a flatbed truck and we later learned the comapny was paying the lease for that vehicle as his reward for being such a good cost cutter.

True story.
David Wagner
50%
50%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
5/30/2014 | 7:16:51 PM
Re: Pizza and leadership: the unmentioned rule
The idea here is basically that the organization is made up of "cells" of no more than, say, 8 people (assuming 8 slices per pie, two slices per person)? Surely at some point they must have to meet on a larger scale...

I noticed Charlie said development teams and not just teams. I suspect they have bigger teams in other depasrtments. It seems reasonable to imagine that in development teams where agility is needed and where work can be divided.
<<   <   Page 9 / 11   >   >>


IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
InformationWeek's IT Perception Survey seeks to quantify how IT thinks it's doing versus how the business really views IT's performance in delivering services - and, more important, powering innovation. Our results suggest IT leaders should worry less about whether they're getting enough resources and more about the relationships they have with business unit peers.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest September 24, 2014
Start improving branch office support by tapping public and private cloud resources to boost performance, increase worker productivity, and cut costs.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.