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Pizza & Leadership: 4 Lessons
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Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
6/9/2014 | 3:40:50 AM
Re: Be one of the gang
Dave, 

Another thing that proves to be sucessful is to never forget you were not born being a boos. Most likely you climbed the career ladder passing through all the steps your employees are at today. 

Remember that keeps you being one of the gang at the same time that you have the tools to lead your gang. Otherwise, you weren't the boss. :D

Plus, you can be an inspiration and role model for your employees, and maybe one day one of them becomes a boss and remembers you as their example and inpiration.

In other words, you can be a good influence creating future good bosses. 

Having a good memory, then, will also buy you a lot of pizza. :) 

-Susan 
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
6/9/2014 | 3:21:58 AM
Re: Free Pizza
"I get invitations from established vendors with "limited" seating for lunch seminars then I have them calling and more or less begging me to come out the week before the seminar, probably because they need to fill seats to justify the expense.  Sometimes the meeting gives me the feeling that I should have just stayed in the office because I could have read through a set of technical documents faster but in others people engage and it moves away from being a dry sales pitch."

SaneIT, there are two reasons for such invitation and begging. First is they have to fill the seat with certain level of peoples and secondly there after they may be behind you for the business.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2014 | 7:36:04 AM
Re: Free Pizza
That may be true, I can't say that I would put it past a desperate sales person to bribe a customer.  I've had lunches at some very nice restaurants where a presenter droned on an no one paid any attention but then I've been to others where I felt like I didn't have time to eat because I was too busy asking questions and was caught up in the presentation.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 8:59:03 PM
Sugar Coated Reality
Hi David   It is certainly great to see you here Sir.    I am getting familiar with the site, and it great to see a familiar face in the crowd.

I really like this first piece, and I really can relate to the first principle of getting your workers to buy pizza for the boss.

Show evidence of need - it would be so nice to hear the truth ( that layoffs will be the result ) of a unsuccessful project.  Because it (layoffs) will happen whether you "sugar coat reality" or not.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 8:14:53 PM
Re: Leadership personality
@impactnow: My advice to all the micromanagers out there - and you know who you are, or do you? - is if you don't like the work style of your subordinate, it is best not to delegate the task and just do it yourself.  Or at least provide step-by-step instructions on how you want something done.  And if you don't, then do not expect someone with a different set of skills, knowledge and abilities (read: every other person in the world) to complete a task in the same way you think is best.

Why is it some managers just want to work with clones of themselves?  I mean it's their show and they are entitled to run it how they want, but seriously now...get over yourselves.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/4/2014 | 3:59:46 PM
Re: Free Pizza
@SaneIT- I think you are hitting on the difference between a gift and a bribe. A gift is something you give to someone for doing something that you know they'd have done anyway. it is designed to show appreciation. A bribe is when you give somethign to someone to do something you know they wouldn't do otherwise.

When it comes to online content or sale pitches or any of those sorts of things, the difference has to do with the event and not the gift. It is so hard to tell until it is too late. I think the degree of desperation in the sales pitch is the only way.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 7:15:01 AM
Re: Free Pizza
@Gigi3, that is true.  I get invitations from established vendors with "limited" seating for lunch seminars then I have them calling and more or less begging me to come out the week before the seminar, probably because they need to fill seats to justify the expense.  Sometimes the meeting gives me the feeling that I should have just stayed in the office because I could have read through a set of technical documents faster but in others people engage and it moves away from being a dry sales pitch.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 1:33:56 AM
Re: Productivity
"I would agree with you. I think even most managers would agree with you in the abstract. It is one of those self-evident points of management that managers always get wrong in real life. I wonder where we get the disconnect? And how do we fix it?"

David, they are disconnecting where there is a communication gap or when they fail to understand certain emotions. The best way is get socialized and always be as a good listener for them.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 1:31:39 AM
Re: Free Pizza
"Now some of the "free lunch" invitations I've been getting recently are starting to make sense.  There is a local company offering to send a pizza to my office so I can eat while watching a webinar, I guess this is to make sure I'm ready to soak in all the information they are about to present."

saneIT, it can be the other way too. I mean, attracting more audience for the webinar by offering snacks and Pizzas
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
6/3/2014 | 1:05:42 PM
Leadership personality
The management style that is least productive is micromanaging all it does is build distrust. I think all the tips are very beneficial especially being part of the gang and always remembering to say thank you. Sometimes management depends on big events for big impact but really it's the events of every day that shape employee morale.
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