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Pizza & Leadership: 4 Lessons
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SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/5/2014 | 7:36:04 AM
Re: Free Pizza
That may be true, I can't say that I would put it past a desperate sales person to bribe a customer.  I've had lunches at some very nice restaurants where a presenter droned on an no one paid any attention but then I've been to others where I felt like I didn't have time to eat because I was too busy asking questions and was caught up in the presentation.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 8:59:03 PM
Sugar Coated Reality
Hi David   It is certainly great to see you here Sir.    I am getting familiar with the site, and it great to see a familiar face in the crowd.

I really like this first piece, and I really can relate to the first principle of getting your workers to buy pizza for the boss.

Show evidence of need - it would be so nice to hear the truth ( that layoffs will be the result ) of a unsuccessful project.  Because it (layoffs) will happen whether you "sugar coat reality" or not.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Moderator
6/4/2014 | 8:14:53 PM
Re: Leadership personality
@impactnow: My advice to all the micromanagers out there - and you know who you are, or do you? - is if you don't like the work style of your subordinate, it is best not to delegate the task and just do it yourself.  Or at least provide step-by-step instructions on how you want something done.  And if you don't, then do not expect someone with a different set of skills, knowledge and abilities (read: every other person in the world) to complete a task in the same way you think is best.

Why is it some managers just want to work with clones of themselves?  I mean it's their show and they are entitled to run it how they want, but seriously now...get over yourselves.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/4/2014 | 3:59:46 PM
Re: Free Pizza
@SaneIT- I think you are hitting on the difference between a gift and a bribe. A gift is something you give to someone for doing something that you know they'd have done anyway. it is designed to show appreciation. A bribe is when you give somethign to someone to do something you know they wouldn't do otherwise.

When it comes to online content or sale pitches or any of those sorts of things, the difference has to do with the event and not the gift. It is so hard to tell until it is too late. I think the degree of desperation in the sales pitch is the only way.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 7:15:01 AM
Re: Free Pizza
@Gigi3, that is true.  I get invitations from established vendors with "limited" seating for lunch seminars then I have them calling and more or less begging me to come out the week before the seminar, probably because they need to fill seats to justify the expense.  Sometimes the meeting gives me the feeling that I should have just stayed in the office because I could have read through a set of technical documents faster but in others people engage and it moves away from being a dry sales pitch.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 1:33:56 AM
Re: Productivity
"I would agree with you. I think even most managers would agree with you in the abstract. It is one of those self-evident points of management that managers always get wrong in real life. I wonder where we get the disconnect? And how do we fix it?"

David, they are disconnecting where there is a communication gap or when they fail to understand certain emotions. The best way is get socialized and always be as a good listener for them.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
6/4/2014 | 1:31:39 AM
Re: Free Pizza
"Now some of the "free lunch" invitations I've been getting recently are starting to make sense.  There is a local company offering to send a pizza to my office so I can eat while watching a webinar, I guess this is to make sure I'm ready to soak in all the information they are about to present."

saneIT, it can be the other way too. I mean, attracting more audience for the webinar by offering snacks and Pizzas
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Strategist
6/3/2014 | 1:05:42 PM
Leadership personality
The management style that is least productive is micromanaging all it does is build distrust. I think all the tips are very beneficial especially being part of the gang and always remembering to say thank you. Sometimes management depends on big events for big impact but really it's the events of every day that shape employee morale.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/3/2014 | 7:07:13 AM
Re: Free Pizza
I haven't taken them up on the offer yet because they haven't had a seminar that I was interested in but the first one that comes up that sounds interesting to me I'm going to give it a try.  It does make me wonder how many people are out there doing this though since there seems to be some solid experiences with food and meetings.
cafzali
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cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
6/2/2014 | 9:51:06 PM
Re: "thank you"
@snunyc It's been my experience that this is a more common struggle for female managers. I think the most common reason this is the case is because there are fewer women managers, period. In other words, when something's not really unique, there's no associated pressure to be a good representation of a new trend; you can just take on the style that you believe works for you and your organization and that's that.

One of the things I've observed is that you can have a male manager that can be a nightmare to work for, but he's not likely to get labeled as much as a famele manager who people may not like. When a male is like that, it's just sort of taken as a given that a certain percentage are that way. But when women are like that, it's seen as a problem they need to remedy.

The other basic reason this is a struggle is we in America tack on all these extra things to workers and managers besides their performance. If you got rid of most of it and just looked at whether a person or manager was good at their job and if they could get along with the necessary people, then life would be much simpler. And, in reality, those are the things that should really matter.
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