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Big Data Learns To Write
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Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
6/2/2014 | 3:34:23 PM
Interesting
Can a reader typically tell that a story was generated by robot? Seems likely that after some time regular subscribers to a sports site will notice that their newsletters (or whatever the output) are exactly the same structure and lack (presumably) the flourishes that a human writer might add. 

And, if they do notice, do they perceive the quality as better, worse or on par with a human-written article?
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 3:58:09 PM
Re: Interesting
I have read a few Narrative Science articles, and I could see an error or two. But this is the beginning. These bugs will get worked out, and this will likely become a trend. There is so much information out there today to be written about that there will be a need for algorithms to put some stories together.

But other than mining data, I'm not sure how these software programs will write more complex stories for the time being. 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
6/3/2014 | 9:01:00 AM
Re: Interesting
I wrote about Narrative Science shortly after it received a round of funding in September 2013 that brought up the total funding at that point to $20 million. The concept came to be a as a Northwestern University research project called StatsMonkey.  Two professors, Kris Hammond and Larry Birnbaum  advised computer science and journalism students on developing software that could generate an account of baseball games solely from batter statistics. After college, two students, John Templon and Nick Allen obtained funding to launch the business that was incorporated as Narrative Science in January 2010.   Subsequently, StatsMonkey was replaced by the more sophisticated Quill™,  a "patented artificial intelligence authoring platform."

In a guest blog on HBR, entitled "The Value of Big Data Isn't the Data," Hammond made argued that algorithms write better narratives based on big data  than peopple because algorithms make the process of turning big data into narratives that people relate to seamless. "By embracing the power of the machine, we can automatically generate stories from the data that bridge the gap between numbers and knowing."

And the narratives are supposed not sound robotic.  Jonathan Morris, COO of a financial analysis firm called Data Explorers, which set up a securities newswire using Narrative Science technology, was quoted in a Wired article saying,  "You can get anything, from something that sounds like a breathless financial reporter screaming from a trading floor to a dry sell-side researcher pedantically walking you through it." 

 
ElizabethFarabee
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ElizabethFarabee,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/3/2014 | 4:39:30 PM
Re: Interesting
Hi Lorna,

I agree with you that any story or piece of text, which is generated by a robot, be as human-like as possible.

No human would write any story or text in exactly the same way twice. We would include the use of synonyms - both in terms of the variety of the vocabulary we use, as well as variations in sentence and paragraph structure and form.

However, only one software company owns the US patent of this feature. 

Yseop (full disclosure: I work for them) is a natural language generating software based on artificial intelligence which writes - truly just like a human being. We are able to do this thanks to a unique, patented aspect of our technology which allows us to incorporate synonyms, both in terms of word choice and sentence structure on the text. Each person can specify the vocab words most appropriate to their industry and the type of output they want the robot to produce, and Yseop ensures the human-like nature of the text!

In our ideal world, readers wouldn't ask this question because they wouldn't notice the difference!

-Elizabeth
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
6/11/2014 | 8:36:11 PM
Re: Interesting
@Elizabeth How do you distinguish your computer's writing from NarrativeScience's? That company also claims that what it produces will sound like the product of a human being. 
ElizabethFarabee
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ElizabethFarabee,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/12/2014 | 6:23:23 AM
Re: Interesting
Hi Arielle,

Good question!

There are several points which distinguish us more broadly from Narrative Science:
  • Only Yseop writes reports in real time.
  • Only Yseop contains a unique dialogue engine, which allows it to interact with and gather contextual data from the user (using closed questions).
  • Only Yseop writes in multiple languages (English, Spanish, French, German, etc.).
  • Only be Yseop can be installed on a customers' servers (so they can maintain data confidentiality). Yseop can also be run in the cloud.          
  • Only Yseop allows users to build & maintain applications on their own. 
  • Only Yseop provides non-Regression, Impact and Coherence Testing tools to ensure accuracy and consistency of the generated text.
  • Only Yseop holds a patent on its unique ability to write using synonyms.

However, to answer your question more specifically--it is really this last point which ensures that Yseop writes "like a human being". As I mentioned in my previous comment, we are able to do this because we incorporate synonyms, both in terms of word choice and sentence structure in the software. This ensures that no two sentences are written exactly the same way for the same type of output. Yseop knows the difference between a subject, verb and complement - which allows us to dynamically construct sentences from the rules of grammar. We do not use templates.

I hope that answers your question!

Best regards,

Elizabeth 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
6/12/2014 | 8:43:27 AM
Re: Interesting
@Elizabeth very interesting. Thanks for going through the details for me. 


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