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Windows 8.1 Makes Gains, XP Hangs On
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Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
6/2/2014 | 9:18:45 PM
Microsoft shouldn't have to support everything it's ever produced
I think a very good case could be made that Windows XP should have been continued to be supported, given the large user base. But making the case that a software company must continue to support every product that it's ever produced would make the software business untenable. Some future Harvard Business Review case study will examine a company that attempted to do that -- and failed as a business. Software products should have a lifecycle. But when the product still has many millions of users, it's a gargantuan job to convince them that its lifecycle is over.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 6:49:26 PM
newest platforms
"Apple has been more successful than Microsoft in moving users to its newest platforms"

Not really by a huge margin though: 56% vs 50.2%.
Taking in consideration that Mavericks and 8.1 are free updates/download, I wonder why we don't see more people upgrading their systems.
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 3:48:58 PM
Re: XP
The only reason is Microsoft's reason: They must continue to iterate in order to make money. In a subscription-based SaaS world, that doesn't make any sense. Going forward, I hope that Microsoft sees the err in its ways and just sell licensing for a period of time.

Then they can make users happy that want to stay on a previous OS. I like Windows 7, what's wrong with that?
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
6/2/2014 | 3:35:42 PM
XP
It's been said before, and I'll say it again. Other than the fact that Microsoft doesn't support it anymore, there is/was no reason for most of us to leave XP. Since Window 7, which I now use, is closest in look and feel to XP, that's what most others have chosen, too. Microsoft may have given a party, but very few people choose to attend.

I don't care that it's however old it is. For those of us who aren't professional developers, XP was perfectly adequate. As more and more of what most of us do is on the cloud anyway, the operating system itself is a smaller and smaller issue.

What I really resent that if you're big enough, like the British or Dutch governments, you get to stay with XP. What I really admire is China's move to Linux
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