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Geeks Versus Jocks: CIOs, Beware Your Culture
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batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
6/13/2014 | 3:45:09 PM
Re: Identity Crises
Dave... it could be secret brotherhood of Google... but time will tell...
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/9/2014 | 4:55:55 PM
Re: Identity Crises
@snunyc- Another interesting part of this is that a shockingly large portion of Google's employees went to one of only three colleges. Perhaps, some of the blame falls on the colleges. Or on college admissions or education in general.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/9/2014 | 4:51:57 PM
Re: Identity Crises
@sfergusen10001- I get your point, but they only admitted their problem days ago but thye've had the problem for decades. So we'll see what, if anything, that actually can achieve.

Clearly, the problem is bigger than just one company. For instance, with women, they avoid the field entirely which is not good for IT. 

But I look at it this way. If a company makes a real effort at this, they are goign to gain a stratrgic advantage. Not only will they have a more efficient set of teams, they will have access to talent many other companies are ignoring. 

Just like addiction, the first step is admitting you have a problem.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Strategist
6/9/2014 | 1:39:28 PM
Google is not alone
Google is not alone in its lack of diversity, its and endemic corporate problem. Dave you have hit the nail on the head  about diversity --it goes way beyond race or gender. Having a diverse workforce in every aspect assures that you have the types of people to successfully fill every position. The same type of person will fill only one type of need. If a company is serious about growth and innovation it will embrace diversity on every level.
sferguson10001
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sferguson10001,
User Rank: Moderator
6/9/2014 | 11:02:57 AM
Re: Identity Crises
@snunyc: To that point, I think we are talking about a larger culture shift in how we educate people in the STEM field. In the last few weeks, there have been some articles about how students are learning to code earlier and earlier. Despite all the perks of Google, it's going to take a much larger cultural change to bring more students into the STEM market, as well as to diversify that talent pool. Google and other big-time Silicon Valley companies also tend to take coders and other engineers from the most elite universities thanks to the big bonuses they pay. Maybe one way is to strengthen the IT- and engineer-related programs that are create at smaller universities and colleges.

 
zaious
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zaious,
User Rank: Strategist
6/8/2014 | 11:19:46 PM
Re: Monoculture
Obviously, Yahoo might not have walked that path if the company was very happy with its current situation. They felt the need to pull things up by the bootstrap. 

Offering non-monetary perks are a good way to keep employees a bit happier, but in the long run they will switch where the pay is better. However, these perks keep them content for some time (and may even prevent them from job searching).
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 6:14:57 PM
Re: Monoculture
@Progman2000: Yahoo is the only recent example I can think of where a dispersed workforce was required to return to working in the office. From what I have read about it, that was the right move for that company at that time. In general, though, most people I know and most companies I have worked for in the past 10 years have allowed some degree of remote work and in some cases have fully encouraged it. I think this became especially important during the last recession, when companies could not offer salary increases, or in some cases had to cut salaries, and yet wanted a way to retain their top performers. Perks such as telecommuting, additional vacation time and other things that had no "hard cost" associated with them started to becomre more common and are now fully entrenched. I don't think we'll ever turn back the clock on this trend.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 6:11:29 PM
Re: Identity Crises
@sferguson10001: It could be that Google's lack of diversity is, in part, a reflection of the available labor pool especially when it comes to the tech-related job openings there. Although, as I recall, the Google report said that something close to 50% of its workforce was in non-tech related jobs. while much has been written about the lack of diversity in the overall STEM labor pool -- with no really good answers as to why this is the case -- I can't imagine the same argument could be made for the non-tech jobs at Google or anyplace else. It's a problem of human nature, and an organization has to provide the training and top-down culture that helps people avoid the "like-hires-like" default that so many of us may act upon, oftentimes without even being aware of it.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Moderator
6/6/2014 | 4:15:45 PM
Re: Monoculture
I thought we were past the era of companies wanting employees centrally located.  I'm also curious as to where you have seen differently lately.  I was actually starting to wonder if some companies were rushing too fast to utilizing a remote workforce.
sferguson10001
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sferguson10001,
User Rank: Moderator
6/5/2014 | 5:35:57 PM
Re: Identity Crises
@DavidWagner: What I think is most interesting here, and especially with the Google example you used to illustrate the point, is how hard it is for companies to create the kind of ideal culture you want. After all, if Google admits that its corporate makeup is not where it should be, how can other companies achieve what one of the world's best run businesses cannot? In the end, maybe the decisions are driven by expediency and need and not by strategic thinking. Thoughts?
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