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The CIO's 2 New BFFs
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SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/13/2014 | 7:38:58 AM
Re: CDO turf
" CIOs have had to fight to get a "seat at the table" so to speak when it comes to be truly considered an equal member of the C-suite alongside the CFO, COO, etc. "

 

That's the truth, on paper I report to the CFO but I probably spend 3-4 times as much of my day working on thing the COO is asking for.  It's an odd management structure but luckily our CFO and COO get along so I can call them in to meetings together to give an overview of what I have going on without a great deal of drama.  There is defiantly a reluctance to add more C level positions but for me the title isn't the end goal.  

 
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/13/2014 | 7:35:11 AM
Re: CDO turf
Well in my case it has always been me, but I don't carry a C level title.  IT has always been IT who deals with the external resources because we tend to have the project management skills.  A marketing team might have an excellent leader but they tend to be more product minded than project minded so they will let a project run astray in an attempt to get a product produced.  IT tends to keep things more tightly packaged so we end up with the product we originally set out to get by following a path that we know works.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/12/2014 | 2:57:00 PM
Re: CDO turf
@SaneIT: Pointy haired managers: "Who determines when these positions are needed?"

another question to add here is one of power. All "C"-level positions are not created equal, as any CIO can tell you. CIOs have had to fight to get a "seat at the table" so to speak when it comes to be truly considered an equal member of the C-suite alongside the CFO, COO, etc. To some degree, I think the CMO is in the same boat as the CIO, because they are both considered the heads of cost centers instead of revnue generating sides of the business.

The question for me then becomes: Who would hold more power in the organization that has a CDO. If that CDO does not report to the CIO--would the CDO position have more clout because it is seen as being attached to activities that are customer-facing and therefore potentially revenue-generating?
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/12/2014 | 2:52:15 PM
Re: CDO turf
@SaneIT: in your experience, who has been responsible for overseeing the external customer-facing experiences? When tech is involved (website, mobile app, etc) does that fall to the CMO or CIO or someone else entirely?
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/12/2014 | 2:39:27 PM
Re: CDO turf
@Broadway0474: Here's what Gartner had to say on the topic of CDOs, though it doesn't specify whether this refers specifically to Fortune 1000 companies:

Gartner predicts that by 2015, 25 percent of organizations will have a Chief Digital Officer.

"The Chief Digital Officer will prove to be the most exciting strategic role in the decade ahead, and IT leaders have the opportunity to be the leaders who will define it," said David Willis, vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner. "The Chief Digital Officer plays in the place where the enterprise meets the customer, where the revenue is generated and the mission accomplished. They're in charge of the digital business strategy. That's a long way from running back office IT, and it's full of opportunity."

Source: http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2208015

Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/12/2014 | 2:30:59 PM
Re: CDO turf
@jastro: Good stats there, thank you! There are enough CDOs for them to have their own website. We can learn more about their plans for world domination here: http://chiefdigitalofficer.net
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/12/2014 | 2:23:52 PM
Re: CDO turf
@larryloeb: Hilarious: Given a post-Snowden internet, someone that figures out how to use carbon paper and multiple forms in a manila envelope is powerful and far less likely to be intercepted by NSA types.

It  makes not an iota of difference whether you or I are convinced that a CDO is needed. What matters is whether CEOs, boards of directors and other corporate braintrusts (or stockholders) decide that this is the position-du-jour that will solve all the comapny's problems. If that happens and they decide to add CDO to the C-suite, then CIOs at large enterprises will be wise to keep an eye on these developments.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/11/2014 | 7:00:48 AM
Re: "I just eat jelly rolls."
Are you suggesting that  we should  buy them a red shirt and invite them to meet at an exotic location?
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Strategist
6/10/2014 | 10:44:39 PM
Re: CDO turf
Right on. What executive wants to lose power. It's one thing to build a new sub-fiefdom for a CIO, it's another to create a new C-suite position and slice away part of his/her fiefdom. The CDO smells of an idea imported.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/10/2014 | 7:05:29 AM
Re: CDO turf
I was wondering the same thing.  Who determines when these positions are needed? In some cases I can see a CIO agreeing to spin off part of his responsibilities if the company is large enough but in most instances I would think that they would restructure below the CIO to address high volume workloads.  Aside from a slap in the face I can see it as a major hurdle in getting anything done.
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