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Geekend: Sarcasm Detector Wanted
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Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 4:01:29 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
@ProgMan: Curious to know: Why Google? I'd put my $$ on Amazon figuring this out before anyone else.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 4:00:09 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
@Michelle: Are you suggesting the government has no sense of humor? =^_^=

 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 3:58:48 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
@jastro: I've found that the ability to recognize sarcasm even in face-to-face interactions (as with the Big Bang Theory clip Dave shared) is a distinctly regional and cultural thing. I found this out the hard way when I moved from NY (where, I belive, sarcasm was invented) to the Bay Area (where it seems to be nonexistant). I've goten myself in plenty of trouble already over this. so, maybe for the sacasm-impaired this would provide an important public service. The whole idea of the government using something like this gives me the creeps, though.
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 3:56:11 PM
Gov vs Humor
There is hope for the future of funny in the government (at least for today).

@CIA

"We can neither confirm nor deny that this is our first tweet."

 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 3:55:32 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
@SaneIT: I would prefer to see the BS-detector created first. In fact, I think it should first be tested at every occasion where a politician speaks before it gets deployed to the general populace.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Moderator
6/6/2014 | 1:41:40 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
Even if the government realizes it can't be done, you know who can do it? Facebook and Twitter.

 


Eh, I would give Google the nod on figuring out how to do it before Facebook and Twitter.
Michelle
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Michelle,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 10:45:19 AM
Re: Sadly we do need this
Haha! Curious view of natural language processing :) Yes, it does seem as though plenty of government folks are reading "great job guys!" has true and honest not as sarcasm.
jastro
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jastro,
User Rank: Ninja
6/6/2014 | 10:04:09 AM
Re: Sadly we do need this
@dave – Bazinga! Sentiment detectors like Lymbix and others comb through communications for sentiment and tone.  Of all the emotions,  detecting  sarcasm is particularly difficult, since it requires a great deal of context about the writer's subject, as well as an understanding of the use of language and paralanguage (images, etc). But, it can be done, and has been the subject of considerable work in computer labs since the 1970s.

It buys you the same thing that understanding any other emotional state. Emoticons are among the many ways people indicate sarcasm. Watch out for those winking ;-) faces . So, for the foreseeable future, the more textual communication we have, in social media and email, the more we need to understand what it all means in a context that makes sense. Challenging.

So, maybe not so sadly, we do need this.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/6/2014 | 7:34:00 AM
Sadly we do need this
My first thought was wondering how often our government hears "great job on that one guys" and takes it as a compliment rather than sarcasm.  Now I'm pretty sure that some politicians will always spin sarcasm to be a compliment but government agencies really need to be careful about how they take what is said/written/tweeted.  After they get the sarcasm detector figured out the next thing they need to work on is a BS detector so that they can stop taking people who are just spouting off so seriously.  I see a lot of dumb things repeated and wish there was a good way to mark garbage tweets as what they are.
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