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Geekend: Sarcasm Detector Wanted
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Bhori
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Bhori,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/7/2014 | 4:35:46 PM
Re: Sarcasm Detector Wanted
You know those signs at the airport that say, "All jokes about bombs will be taken seriously"? 

Very interesting post, David. The subject remind me of the incident, when I once checked into military college with a bag to meet someone personally. As I was without a car, the person offered me to drop the bag at my location which I accepted, as I was supposed to head somewhere else immediately after there. When I was checking out from the facility & collecting back my ID on the gate, the guard questioned me that "You went in with a bag, where is that". At the first moment, I was amazed at his observance. Then, unintentionally, the reply popped out "I have fitted it". Suddenly expressions gone blanked on the other side, other guards which were hearing the conversation came closer. There was a long pause. Though they understand the joke but certainly they didn't like it. Then, I had to briefly tell them the whole story, and they didn't let me out until they confirmed about the bag with a person I went to meet.
BillK627
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BillK627,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/7/2014 | 12:32:07 PM
Re: Sarcasm at Work
@snunyc,

Yes, the bioepistemological equivalent of sarcasm is a "knife in the back."  It is anger, masked.  The non-passive aggressive equivalent would be the outright expression of one's disagreement, the analog being direct confrontation as if one is standing face-to-face with the polemical (or physical) opponent.

Note the latter (initial, direct questioning or disagreement) also precludes the possibility of an embarrassed rejoinder that all sarcastic people employ when they're not able or not willing to shift to more honest, more open expression after being questioned or challenged about their prior attack:

"C'mon, I was only joking!  Can't you take a joke?!"

Such an excuse by the "joker" is simply another passive-aggressive attack, designed to deflect attention and elicit the one objecting to feel as if there is something wrong with his or her interpretation of the original anger, rather than engaging directly (again) with the intellectual challenger.

Ultimately, sarcasm is a polemical tool used by intellectual cowards.  And trolls.

Bill
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
6/6/2014 | 7:23:50 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
@snunyc very true. I know of some people who don't pick up on sarcasm in person on a regular basis, regardless of the deadpan ability of the speaker. Sarcastic messages wouldn't penetrate unless they are accompanies by some telltale emoticon.  
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 6:04:28 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
@Ariella: That sarcasm font would certainly make it easier for the government to figure this out, eh?

I used to work with someone who was so great at deadpan humor that 9 times out of 10 he would fool me into believeing something he said was sincere or true--and that was in face-to-face conversations. When you take body language and tone of voice out of the equation, sarcasm in email can be a dangerous weapon--or really really funny.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 6:00:58 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
@Thomas: You WIN the prize for BEST comment of the week. LOL LOL
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 5:59:35 PM
Sarcasm at Work
This post has me thinking back on the many times I've employed sarcasm at work. And then I read some leadership material awhile back that said sarcasm is actually an expression of anger. I've always considered sarcasm to be a form of humor, not an expression of anger.So that really opened my eyes.

What do you all think? Is sarcasm just a passive agressive way to express your anger? Do you use sarcasm at work? how do you feel when others at work are sarcastic to you?
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/6/2014 | 5:52:33 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
@Progman: Ha! ok, fair enough. I think we can both agree that some tech company will figure this out long before the Secret Service does. The most shocking thing in Dave's article is that the Secret Service currently uses a FEMA's social media app...
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
6/6/2014 | 4:42:20 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
>I would prefer to see the BS-detector created first. In fact, I think it should first be tested at every occasion where a politician speaks before it gets deployed to the general populace.

Just get a red light and turn it on at the next political rally you attend. You'll have a functioning BS-detector with too few false positives to matter.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
6/6/2014 | 4:41:49 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
@Jastro true, it's not all that easy, which is why someone suggested a sarcasm font.  Without it, some people feel the need to clarify with *sarcasm* or some such thing. Otherwise, it really isn't always clear, especially if you don't know the writer's general views. 
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Moderator
6/6/2014 | 4:03:54 PM
Re: Sadly we do need this
@snunyc - To me Google can figure out a way to do anything.  They can probably figure out my blood type by something I post...
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