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Apple WWDC 2014 Highlights: A New Era?
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anon0308166055
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anon0308166055,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/8/2014 | 4:22:50 PM
Re: You Misunderstand Apple
As a consumer....I would rather have Apple keep a tight grip and have a product that works, than have to replace my devices more rapidly at a much higher cost to me. I used Android first, went to Apple, went back to Android because it appeared to be cheaper, and after my Android phone died with considerable time left on my contract, I went back to Apple. I won't go back to Android, ever! 
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
6/7/2014 | 2:28:48 PM
Re: You Misunderstand Apple
I think that these are concillatory moves in order to appease developers. The amount of frustration that developers have had with Apple has grown. I see this as a PR move for the company to try to keep third parties that contribute to its system at bay. 

And users too. If Apple keeps a tight grip, people will simply move to Android. There are pressures on Apple to keep users happy. And they are trying to make sure that everyone keeps using iOS.  
didiazaria
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didiazaria,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/7/2014 | 1:20:26 PM
At the WWDC, Cook Didnít Spoil the Pot
After the death of Steve Jobs in October 2011, many wondered out loud if Apple would ever be the same. While business leaders around the world argued that Jobs leadership, charisma and perfectionism could never be replaced by Cook who focuses on transparency, teamwork and embodies a calm demeanor, the numbers from the WWDC seem to disagree. The WWDC in the years following Jobs' death have been the most popular years--and 2014 may even break the record holding the highest interest in WWDC ever. more...
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
6/7/2014 | 12:11:58 PM
Re: You Misunderstand Apple
>I disagree with your premiss that "Apple evokes a "my way or the highway" attitude.
>It does what it wants to do with seemingly little or no regard for the wishes of others."
>
>Apple chooses very carefully what it does.

I don't think those two opinions are necessary in conflict with one another. Apple chooses very carefully what it does, and doesn't succumb to pressure to do something because other people think they should. This could well be seen as a "my way or the highway" attitude, because if you happen to not like the way Apple did something (even if you don't understand why they did it) then you don't have much option to work around it. That doesn't have to be a bad thing, it's just the way it is. Do you trust Apple, in general, to make the right decisions? That's your choice. They have a pretty good track record for sure, but there are a few things - like the iOS keyboard - that make you wonder why, if they acknowledge it was lacking, they did nothing about it before then.

I happen to think that Apple's tight control leads to a more stable system, and a more predictable environment for developers, which ultimately benefits the end users. A little flexibility goes a long way though, especially when it comes to elements that users have to deal with every single day.
.really?
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.really?,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/7/2014 | 10:38:11 AM
You Misunderstand Apple
I disagree with your premiss that "Apple evokes a "my way or the highway" attitude. It does what it wants to do with seemingly little or no regard for the wishes of others."

Apple chooses very carefully what it does.

In the instance of BlueRay the industry dawdled and fought from 2000-2008 before deciding on a standard between BlueRay and HD DVD. Eight Years. Why bother, Apple worked toward the real goal - No Disc Digital HD Video. We were going there anyway why stop and buy a bunch of discs again that were going to be obsolete in just a few years. Didn't we just get done doing that whith cassette tapes, CDs, and Beta/VHS?

Flash was another example of people bemoaning a very concidered and logical decision made by Apple. Few people have really read Steve's "Thoughts on Flash" detailing the technical and engineering reasons flash was not adopted for mobile, like impacts on battery life, security, UI issues with no cursor for Flash to detect. The market agreed and the world adapted. Only the shortsighted and ignorant clung to Flash on Mobile.

Apple "opens up" when it thinks it has it's part of the system set. Why no App Store for the original iOS? That first year gave Apple time to get their part right before openning up the iPhone to third party Devs. Openning up was planned well in advance of the the first iPhones release. Just as the use of Touch ID verification, Keyboards and HealthKit/Homekit ave been. 

Swift has been in development for 4 years. It's not something they just decided to do, like you deciding to wear navy blue socks instead of black today. 

The work that Apple and other companies do to create the amazing things they do takes real work over years. Unlike some that roll out of bed and blather about how companies have "Attitudes". 


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