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World Cup Management: Data Or Intuition?
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jastro
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jastro,
User Rank: Ninja
6/10/2014 | 5:21:13 PM
Meet the New Game, Same as the Old Game
>> I'm saying that, to make a good data-driven decisions, you need good data, and good data is found, not in its bigness, but in its rightness. And that's going to take your intuition, whether you like it or not, to figure out what's good and what's bad.

>> But at the same time, you can't assume your intuition is enough.

@dave  --  It sounds like you are looking for the perfect world. Forget Billy Beane. Beane is now Brad Pitt. Here's a quote from Joe Ripp, CEO, Time Magazine:

>>"I can't fix it," Mr. Ripp has said repeatedly in meetings with senior managers. "You have to figure out a way to fix it."

That's yesterday, today, and tomorrow.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/10/2014 | 4:44:43 PM
Re: Whose intuition
@Lorna- Exactly. Which is why management will never really die in the face of data. I think data scientists working for IT can help, but they can never replace the understand of the business. As with everything else in IT, it should be there to serve and transform the business, not act on its behalf. 
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
6/10/2014 | 4:40:58 PM
Whose intuition
The problem to me is that deciphering signal from noise in big data sets is not a job for IT. It's a job for someone intimately familiar with the business. However, how often is it someone in IT deciding what data feeds to add to a dashboard?
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/10/2014 | 4:01:57 PM
Re: a better test for big data
@Thomas- They no doubt have plenty of game data on corner kicks. Thousands of games across dozens of leagues with corner kicks analyzed both via video and through chips int he balls. 

The questions that seem difficult to answer are a) Does that alone move you from a 3rd place team to a first place team? b) Once everyone has the data, does it change? c) Even if it doesn't change (say it is just inherent to the game) how quickly is the advantage eroded by everyone copying?

It is a similar issue that companies face when they innovate and people quickly copy their efforts.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
6/10/2014 | 3:59:00 PM
a better test for big data
The Manchester City story is interesting. I wonder though whether this one anecdoate isn't cherry-picked to illustrate the value of big data. Do we have a broad enough set of example teams using such data to conclude that it improves outcomes?
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