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16 NoSQL, NewSQL Databases To Watch
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
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6/12/2014 | 10:57:30 AM
Great examples
Doug, helpful context on a wide group of key players here. The Weather Company's project needs offer a great example of the scale issue. See this related article on their big data work.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
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6/12/2014 | 11:16:38 AM
Do others belong on this list?
These guides can't go on forever. FoundationDB was among the NoSQL vendors I contemplated adding but it didn't make the cut. That said, it's probably just as viable, well-funded and embraced by customers as some of the NewSQL vendors listed above. Are there other deserving companies worthy of watching? List them here, but please include DBMS type, Description, Notable customers, Company status and a brief comment what makes it stand out.
leon.wrinkles
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leon.wrinkles,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/12/2014 | 3:38:10 PM
Re: Do others belong on this list?
  1. MarkLogic is from 2001. It wasn't really part of the NoSQL movement that came after Google's BigTable paper.
  2. SpliceMachine is just a middleware layer on top of HBase. It's not really a new DBMS architecture like the other ones listed here.
  3. Cloudant is just a SaaS provider for CouchDB (which you didn't list).
  4. I've never heard of anybody using TransLattice.
  5. You forgot Pivotal's SQLFire and SAP'S HANA.
  6. There are a bunch of nascent NewSQL systems that are too new to determine whether they are useful: DeepDB, InfiniDB, InfinitySQL, JustOneDB, and FoundationDB.

-- Leon --
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
6/12/2014 | 4:19:49 PM
Re: Do others belong on this list?
Leon,

Thanks for the feedback. A few points on your points:

1. MarkLogic has recast its technology and is on plenty of NoSQL lists.

2. Splice Machine adapts Darby database

3. IBM/Cloudant is only commercial support option we know of for CouchDB. See listing on why it's included. As stated, "CouchDB seems to have been eclipsed..." Who supports the DB on-premises? That's why we focused on Cloudant, not CouchDB. 

4. Yes, many NewSQL vendors have short cusotmer lists -- that why we "watch"

5. SQL Fire and SAP Hana are in-memory, and not in NoSQL group. Just because they are new(er) doesn't make them "NewSQL." I wouldn't list TimesTen or SolidDB here, either.

6. I mentioned FoundationDB in a comment below the article. InfiniDB is aimed at analytics, not transactions. I'm not familiar with the others, but please add details on them in comments if they belong here.

Thanks

Doug
murnane
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murnane,
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8/18/2014 | 10:24:54 AM
Re: Do others belong on this list?
Doug,

Thank you for taking the time to layout the landscape of these vendors and technologies.

I realize you can't list everyone, it'd be silly to assume you could, but I am curious about FoundationDB.  Was there a particular reason it didn't make the cut or did it just plain fall below the line of "enough already"?

Thank you again...Rich Murnane @murnane
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
8/18/2014 | 10:42:52 AM
Re: Do others belong on this list?
Yes, FoundationDB was considered. Honestly we needed to cut it off at a good, round number. Originally I was working on a list of 12 but decided I needed to expand the list. I was looking at things like marquis customers, recent customer wins, volume of announcements and news coverage, number of search hits... all indicators of activity, interest and success.

FoundationDB was in definitely in the running and is also worth a look.   
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
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6/12/2014 | 3:59:22 PM
HBase avalable at GoGrid
Hbase was one of the systems in place at GoGrid, for those looking for a place to tryit out as a Big Data systems. HBase talks directly to the spinning disk spindles, says CEO John Keagy.
mulpat
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mulpat,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/13/2014 | 2:33:36 AM
JavaScript for NoSQL
Hi Doug, that's a great post, thanks! One point that I am missing is the increasingly important role of JavaScript for dealing with NoSQL. Many of the NoSQL databases are based on a RESTful API that provides data as JSON. By haviing a database support JavaScript, programmers can re-use over 70k libraries to manage and analyze data, which sounds very promising in my view as application developer. One of the interesting ideas is that with JSON you can apply different data models, such as key-value, documents and most recently graphs. An interesting comparison of database that use JavaScript is here: https://www.arangodb.org/2012/11/13/comparing-arangodb-with-mongodb-and-couchdb - but with ArangoDB supporting graphs, it looks most promising to me.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
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6/13/2014 | 12:15:51 PM
On CloudDB: Why I didn't list it separately
A couple of CloudDB developers/fans have Tweeted that I should have listed CloudDB on its own merits, but there are several reasons why I didn't. First off, Cloudant is the only support option we know of for CouchDB (Are we missing a real option, here? We've asked and searched to no avail.) Cloudant only offers it as a service in the cloud. Second, there's evidence that CouchDB has been "eclipsed," as I state in my commentary on Cloudant, by rivals including Couchbase and MongoDB.

If CouchDB were more in demand, wouldn't we know about a company staking its future on supporting CouchDB on premises? I'm not disputing that CouchDB was early to NoSQL and has many fans. But without support, there is no hope for CouchDB to see broad enterprise adoption. If not for the existance of DataStax, for example, I would not have listed Cassandra. And if not for MongoDB the company (formerly 10Gen), MongoDB would not be where it is today.

In the case of CouchDB, it was included indirectly only because IBM bought Cloudant. IBM has the wherewithall to do whatever it wants. If it wants to support CouchDB on premises, the fortunes of CouchDB, the open source database, will greatly rise. Rivals speculate that it only bought Cloudant for its database-as-a-service technology. That's why CouchDB - by way of IBM/Cloudant - is a NoSQL option to watch. We'll find out soon enough whether IBM is going to throw some real weight behind CouchDB. 
nslater
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nslater,
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6/13/2014 | 12:38:00 PM
Re: On CloudDB: Why I didn't list it separately
The Couch Firm provides support for CouchDB on-premises:

"The Couch Firm provides training, consulting, custom development, and support services for Apache CouchDB from the people you know and trust.

"Our team is a professional collective made up of people who contribute to the Apache CouchDB project and its community."

I believe The Couch Firm is modelled on The Node Firm, which does something similar for Node.js.

My larger point here was that Cloudant is in the process of merging its CouchDB fork back into the project. Once that happens, IBM engineers will be working directly on the project, contributing fixes, features, and enhancements directly to CouchDB. At this point, there will be parity between CouchDB (the DB you can download and run on premises) and Cloudant (the CouchDB platform).

I understand that Cloudant will continue to offer value-added extras on top of CouchDB, much in the same way as Hortonworks or Cloudera add in features to their own distributions of Hadoop.

I'm not employed by Cloudant, so I don't know if IBM has any plans to offer on premises support.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
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6/13/2014 | 12:43:50 PM
Re: On CloudDB: Why I didn't list it separately
Follow that link to "The Couch Firm" and you won't find much there, there. It's just a landing page with no information about a company, its services/support offerings, its customers. It's history. Etc. Like I wrote and as these comments acknowlege, CouchDB's future is now closely tied up into whatever IBM does with Cloudant's technology. That's why CouchDB showed up in our listing by way of IBM/Cloudant.
mraffi
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mraffi,
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6/13/2014 | 12:44:43 PM
Re: On CloudDB: Why I didn't list it separately
I couldn't have said it any better nslater. Perfect.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
6/13/2014 | 2:17:32 PM
More evidence on the state of CouchDB
In February 2013, Jan Lehnardt wrote about "The State of CouchDB" at length. He felt compelled to assert that "CouchDB is not Dead," and added a lot of detail about a "CouchDB reboot." If you're interested in knowing more about CouchDB, I would read this article and know that the the database's fortunes have only improved with IBM's Cloudant purchase. But I did not separtely list it as a NoSQL "database to watch" and it would not have even come up if not for the IBM/Cloudant deal.

According to posts, Jan is affiliated with The Couch Firm, but do an Internet search of that name you'll see that it's a fledgling entity that emerged last year. I can't find much evidence -- just some Tweets and a single static web page -- of a solid, stable org that a company would trust to support a mission-critical application. 
mraffi
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mraffi,
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6/13/2014 | 2:47:56 PM
Re: More evidence on the state of CouchDB
Hey, its your list, so you get to pick what gets on it.

But know that there are better lists that dont omit big things based on points like the ones you seem to be making.
sdlashley
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sdlashley,
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6/13/2014 | 2:10:25 PM
Don't forget about IBM Informix
IBM Informix

DBMS type: SQL + NoSQL

Description: Its Informix... If you're not familiar with Informix yet, what rock are you under?

Comment: While traditional relational databases did not originate with mobile, social and big data types in mind, that doesn't mean they can't handle those things with ease. Not all traditional databases were created the same. Architecture matters! Informix supports JSON & BSON as a native type. That means you get enterprise class scalability (scale up to 2mil transactions a sec & scale out to hundreds of nodes). Want to see relational as JSON? Want to see JSON as relational? Want to run queries that join between relational and JSON or JSON to JSON? Use your existing mongo app and point it at Informix... no problem. Best solution in the world for TimeSeries data and you can do TimeSeries in JSON. Same goes for spatial. Want BLU acceleration of JSON docs? Got that too!
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
6/13/2014 | 2:19:17 PM
Re: Don't forget about IBM Informix
You must be kidding! This is a listing of "New"SQL offerings. What's the Informix story on ease/cost of ultra-high scale and ease of admin at that scale? Then let's talk about cost. Sure, big banks are still using Informix (invented circa 1980), but it doesn't belong on this list.
sdlashley
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sdlashley,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/13/2014 | 4:13:35 PM
Re: Don't forget about IBM Informix
I can see you are under a rock.

Informix is legendary in its ease of use. Don't believe? Ask folks who actually use the product.

Want to talk cost? Lets take Mongo... if you never need to do a backup, then sure, its pretty cheap. But, want to backup your data? That's gonna cost you. When you add in support costs and the costs of building and deploying enterprise class applications, Informix is very competitive. You want to go cheap? Informix runs on ARM & Quark servers too.

Plus, you get 30 years of experience on supporting a product that is deployed everywhere... telecom, retail, banking, gaming and a great and knowledgable users group community.

What's your definition of NoSQL or NewSQL? Just because a product has been around awhile doesn't disqualify it from being considered if it does most of what the other's claim to do. Why so narrow focused?
ardanstudios_bill
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ardanstudios_bill,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/14/2014 | 8:49:12 AM
MongoDB vs other NoSQL databases
I think it is good to compare all the NoSQL databases against each other's technical merits and MongoDB will easily hold its own. One thing never talked about are the companies and communities behind these technologies. If you are deploying an application or platform for production use, there are other serious questions you need to ask. What if you find a bug? Where can I go to get questions answered? How is the documentation? Is there a real company with real people behind it? One thing MongoDB has done very well is establish themselves in the technical community. The company provides incredible documentation, free training classes and a very active community blog. They support local Meetups throughout the world and have created a online community where no one ever needs to feel alone. They listen to their customers and have grown their products and services to meet their needs. I believe this is why MongoDB has become the NoSQL database everyone looks at and ends up choosing in the end.
IAmOnDemand01
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IAmOnDemand01,
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6/15/2014 | 5:07:24 AM
redis and scalebase
 So many options there.. you didnt mention

 

Redis - you can check the redislabs offering

 

and Scalebase.com who have an interesting techonlogy that support delineation between the application and the distributed database mechanism.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
6/15/2014 | 1:51:06 PM
Re: redis and scalebase
I did mention Redis in the intro, along with Memchached and why I didn't include them.


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