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Yahoo, LinkedIn, Google: Not A Diverse Club
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LastC318
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LastC318,
User Rank: Strategist
6/18/2014 | 12:50:51 PM
Re: What's the point?
the information they need to release is the diversity in the job applications.  you can't hire unqualified people, and you can't hire people who don't apply.  this is a non-event.  maybe the ones they think are missing are starting their own companies.  the idea that the workplace has to mirror the populace is a lame idea to begin with.  it may not be social engineering, but it is tokenism at its worst.
Yoda123
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Yoda123,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/18/2014 | 12:41:23 PM
Looks quite diverse to me.
Looks quite diverse - 39% Asian. And on top of that, Asia itself is a very diverse continent. There are countries like India, Pakistan, China, Japan, Various middle-eastern countries and so on.

 
anon1588678230
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anon1588678230,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/18/2014 | 12:35:35 PM
What's the point?
In this article, InformationWeek is pointing to several of the most successful companies of the twenty-first century and effectively saying, "Whoa!  You don't have enough black people, latinos, or women.  What's up with that?"  But these companies are doing things no one else is, in new and exciting ways, and making fortunes in fields that established companies have not generally pursued business or succeeded.

It's not surprising that Google's workforce is primarily male and either Caucasian or Asian, because these are the demographics primarily correlated with engineering in general and software engineering in particular.  It also makes no difference, because it's not holding back innovation.  The reason companies value diversity is because it leads to corresponding shareholder value.  Diversity is not about conforming to some social-engineering checklist.
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