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After Ballmer: 8 Execs You Love To Hate
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jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2014 | 3:49:18 PM
Where is Larry Ellison?
He should have been first on the list.

 
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2014 | 3:49:00 PM
Re: Marissa Mayer: Please Step on Up
@David    I like the bet and thanks for explaining Yahoo's ultimate game plan.  And I agree Mobile will be the maker or breaker here.   

I actually wish Marissa luck - I like her. 

Just not Yahoo.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2014 | 3:38:01 PM
Re: Mayer & Telecommuting
@Rob: While I disagree with Mayer's telecommuting policy, that's not what I take issue with.

She's been very public about her experiences as a parent and CEO, and her statements on these topics have mostly shown her to be completely tone deaf to the realities of being a working parent without the perks that come with a huge salary.

As far as I know, she also has not provided any forward-thinking policies for the rank-and-file at Yahoo that show she really has a grasp of what it's like to be a working parent. Sure, she has increased paid maternity leave to 16 weeks for women and 8 weeks for men.

If she really wanted to be groundbreaking, she would adopt some of the parental leave pollicies of European businesses, some of which provide up to a year of paid leave for both parents. She had the opportunity to be a true champion of working parents here when it comes to creating a family-friendly workplace, and IMHO she has failed to do so.

On the flipside, of course, there's an unfair expectation of women CEOs to talk publicly about parenting and family in a way we'd never expect from male CEOs. When was the last time anyone asked a male CEO how they balance work life and family life?

Sincerely,

Conflicted
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2014 | 3:37:25 PM
Re: Marissa Mayer: Please Step on Up
@technocrati- Fair enough. I think the local market is so underserved int he internet that it is a brilliant growth strategy if you can use technology to scale it. Right now, the internet is crowded at the top with a few sites dominating traffic for national stuff. But that's a crowded and expensive space. 

Local is the "bottom of the pyramid" in a good way. there are millions and millions of tiny little sites dedicated to little niches and small towns that get a tiny bit of traffice. But when you add up all that local traffic it is big bucks. If Yahoo can consolidate and replace a bunch of these tiny local services they will grow.

Of course, that requires a mobile strategy. And she claims they're working on that. I thinki that's the key. Because local is also mobile.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2014 | 3:29:12 PM
Re: Marissa Mayer: Please Step on Up
@David   Interesting point,  And I had not considered the local market and Yahoo's positioning there. I personally don't used Yelp or the "local section" much, but I do find it useful when I remember to use it.

But I know there are many people who use these types of services constantly.   This market will certainly keep the lights on.  But will be enough to make them a major player ?   With a little creative accounting, I am sure it will look that way.  

I really don't see Yahoo going anywhere and it would be only wishful thinking to think they would be.

So we'll see, if this market makes them relevant again.  If Marissa does turn things around - I will be the first to sing her praises ( maybe even send her an email ) ,  but until then she ( as CEO ) represents all that is wrong with the Net  IMO.   

The only use I have for Yahoo is their fantasy sports otherwise I would never use it.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2014 | 3:28:49 PM
Re: Marissa Mayer: Please Step on Up
@hh0927: I think Reed Hastings is cuter, but you are onto a larger point here. It seems to me that whenever women are given the opportunity to become CEO of a tech company, it's always a company that is on the brink of failure: Yahoo, HP, Xerox...I'd like to see a female CEO be given the chance to run a company that is in the midst of a string of successes for a change.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2014 | 3:24:24 PM
Re: Marissa Mayer: Please Step on Up
@hho927- I don't think Mayer needed any help being known. As a VP with Google almost from its start, she could have easily been in line to take over ithere n the next few years. She is known for envisioning the layout of the Google search page and did quite important things with Google Maps, search, and images. She has engineering chops as well. 

if she took the job it was because she had a plan, not because she had to. We'll see if it works, but she got the job because she was already known.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2014 | 3:18:35 PM
Re: Mayer & Telecommuting
@Rob- No doubt that's her first duty. But leaders need to know their people and the culture they lead in. And i think she misread the situation in a way that temporarily hurt the company's morale. She could have done exactly what she did in other ways. Lesson learned. But I agree with you to the extent that a leader doesn't have to be liked (though I like her). they have to be respected and make the right decision. And form where i stand, if anyone can turn them around, it is her.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2014 | 3:15:36 PM
Re: Marissa Mayer: Please Step on Up
@technocrati- Maybe this makes me old and obsolete, but I think they can turn it around. I think Yahoo has some interesting inroads in local and viewer-specific news and entertainment. I think if they can hone that to a sharper edge they have a jump on something Google has struggled with. Local is where the next internet advantage is in my opinion.
Henrisha
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Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2014 | 3:11:28 PM
Re: Mayer & Telecommuting
True. Sometimes, I think people forget who's the boss and forget that there's a reason why they're in charge. Some just love to complain and find complaints about their higher-ups without thinking about the surrounding circumstances.
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