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Internet Of Things: New Architecture Needed
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ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
6/30/2014 | 9:28:42 AM
Re: Why continue flogging a dead horse?
Thanks for the perspective, ADDC.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2014 | 10:48:34 PM
Re: Iot
@Hospice: IoT has already started, sure, but if and when doubling-up (and worse) of IPv4 addresses begins to occur should adoption outpace IPv6 deployment, serious security, privacy, and bandwidth problems can result.
Hospice_Houngbo
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Hospice_Houngbo,
User Rank: Moderator
6/29/2014 | 8:59:57 PM
Re: Iot
@Joe: I am not that pessimistic because IoT is already a reality despite the slow pace of IPv6 adoption. When IPv4 addresses are gone, Internet service providers will not have another choice, but to turn IPv6 capability on.
Hospice_Houngbo
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Hospice_Houngbo,
User Rank: Moderator
6/29/2014 | 8:41:46 PM
Re: Another Change for us
Will the existing protocols be able to protect the new attack possibilities brought about by IoT? Is there any best approach based on today's technology to protect IoT or new strategies should be implemented for IoT to be viable?
ADDC
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ADDC,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/27/2014 | 9:48:18 PM
Re: Why continue flogging a dead horse?
Thanks for noticing although nothing in my comments is particularly new. But to elaborate a little in a more abstract domain . . .

It is not unreasonable to suggest that we relate to the world in terms of models of the world that we create cognitively, based on what we have experienced and learned. The better the match between the cognitive model and reality, the greater the efficiency, more rapid the evolution, and greater the possibility of survival and growth. In short, the better the model, the better the predictibility and the flow-on of advantages, whether unforeseen or planned.

Computation and its relation to the internet has reached a complexity which suggests it should be considered more seriously for what it is or rather what it will become, particularly when conceived of as "infrastructure"; rather than being ad hoc expansion based on corporate interest and its drive for product advantage. This drive creates a situation where reality is not well matched to any particular model or theory (if one can even exist within such a "reality bubble"). This in turn drives reduced integrability and its many negative consequences.

One reason for such problems is our hierarchical interpretation of the structural organization of the world. This is founded on and has arisen through a long interaction between theology, philosophy, and (subsequently) science, which provides a deeply embeded model of the world, its contents, and relationships. It has served well through history while populations and their technological and social sophistication existed in relatively isolated pockets. However, our technical ability to create is beginning to far outstrip the applicability of this model and its ability to organize and control ever-increasing complexity. Particularly as populations and their technological underpinnings become more integrated.

One of the most powerful drivers of the hierarchical world view or model is likely the perceived benefit of simplicity of control. It is for this reason that the current developments beyond the single computer to the implementation of cloud computing has taken the path it has. But it is the highly centralized, layered, and in principle hirarchical organization of cloud computing and its associated technologies that is precisely the reason why it's uptake is impeded. It does not provide a good model of the world, people intuitively know it, and consequently are reluctant to participate. One significant reason for this is that in acquiescing to the hirarchical model, control must be relinquished to a higher level of the hierarchy. So, for example, in adopting the cloud, data and/or software control is typically lost and legalities blurred. Whether real or not, there is at least a psychological sense of loss of control for the client/user.

The problem for the IoT is that the orgainzational philosophies required for its successful implementation are even more strongly opposed to a paradigm of control through hierarchical organization than those employed to create and implement cloud computing functionality. Currently, the solution of truely distributed interactional nodes independently responsible for data retention and interpretation is likely still a step too far. (We already seem to have enought trouble with our cell phones, social networking, and personal computers.)

Once a model has been developed to give a better match with reality, appropriate solutions either present themselves or are readily identified (remembering they can only be as good as the model).

Although it is possible to say much in considerably more detail about solutions and implementation, I guess we must leave it here for the moment . . . only to note Cristian's approach as representative of IoT appears to originate from what might be thought of as an increasingly maladaptive (hierarchical) philosophy and for this reason alone is likely to be either highly inefficient or, worse(?), doomed to failure . . .

 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
6/27/2014 | 6:30:16 PM
Iot
Good luck with that.  We can't even get IPv6 deployment -- a necessary for IoT -- going years after the doomsday date.

Personally, I am not particularly bothered by this stuff anymore because the architectural and infrastructural walls that stand in the way of an IoT world will maybe slow IoT development down enough to get the idiots who make IoT products thinking about security -- because clearly, right now, they don't.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
6/27/2014 | 10:52:42 AM
Re: Why continue flogging a dead horse?
Very interesting ADDC, though I'll confess I can't picture what you envision. I felt like Cristian here is getting at this kind of auto-adaptive, distributed content management that you describe. Could you offer any examples how the reconfiguration you envision differs from today's?
ADDC
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ADDC,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/26/2014 | 9:26:15 PM
Why continue flogging a dead horse?
It is interesting to see the continued obsession in the commercial IT world with attempts to expand and implement communication models based on philosophy increasingly removed from the operational principles of the natural world. The complexity of interaction required for support of an efficient IoT will rapidly break the systems currently being proposed as suitable.

No amount of "cobbling together", redrawing, or creation of "levels" will transparently resolve this problem. What is required are models which better match reality and its requirements. Centeralized hierarchical cloud computing technologies are not a solution as they lie within an aging and nearly defunct maladaptive model and framework (that clearly does not cope). Only a fundamental (philosophical) reconfiguration will lead to the auto-adaptive technology of distributed content management systems the IoT requires.
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
6/26/2014 | 1:54:30 PM
Re: Another Change for us
Nice to see some thought going on about how to better structure IoT communications.  I think this is a great start to build more specific standards around.  Perhaps data priority could also be utilized as a factor, so that critical infrastructure would get different priority levels than less critical data flows (might help with the sheer volume of traffic as well!).
zaious
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zaious,
User Rank: Strategist
6/26/2014 | 1:36:31 PM
Another Change for us
IoT is the new wave that will make us undergo another change. I liked the 3DIA -it's design priciples are few yet to the point. I am also worried about the traffic that will flood the networks.


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