Comments
BlackBerry Swipes At Android Security
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
GiT265
50%
50%
GiT265,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/19/2014 | 11:38:00 PM
Android Security dissertation
Hello. I am starting my dissertation on Android Security. Please help me by visiting my kickstarter project and support. Here is the link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1910422777/dissertation-android-application-security
cafzali
50%
50%
cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
6/30/2014 | 1:56:23 PM
Re: Tears of lost glory
@Les Beyond its incompetence, Blackberry appears to be making the even harder to explain move of mocking other companies that are more successful. 

Blackberry seems to forget that market share renders a lot of other points moot, including product superiority. All of us know scads of products and services that had advantages over companies who were leaders at the time, but couldn't get it together enough to be a sincere challenger. 

This just sounds like another example of this with a layer of "sour grapes"  on the top.
SaneIT
50%
50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2014 | 7:42:23 AM
Re: Security, Reliability and Market share
"So why is Blackberry upset? They have reliability issues due to the design of having everything go through their data-center. This channel has failed more than once. Lesson learned, single point of failure bad. The android mechanism provides a mechanism to "privatize" the key data synchronization into each"

 

These are very good points, and one of the reasons I was very happy to finally turn off the last company owned Blackberry device a few years ago and to shut down our BES server.  Blackberry put a good deal of emphasis on controlling the software, data and connection but the outages were more than just a little irritating.  I think everyone has been waiting for Apple and Google to get a better mobile management system implemented but we have also realized that we can survive without a Blackberry style implementation.  We've started looking at smartphones as little laptops and treat them the same way. 

 
Midnight
50%
50%
Midnight,
User Rank: Guru
6/29/2014 | 7:31:46 PM
Security, Reliability and Market share
This is a conversation I have been waiting over a year to happen.

To make a successful hybrid of business and personal data and devices segmentation and proper authoritative control is a key element. I give a standing ovation (of one, me at least) to Google for actually starting the development of the key controls in this element that has actually been needed for decades. (yeah, laptops needed it but never got it back in the day) I see this as a core "feature" technology mechanism that will be taken for granted within the next five years.

So what should this really look like from a use-case point of view. I believe that enterprise IT needs the authority and immediate ability to protect the corporate intellectual property (and devices) through the tools of absolute policy control and ability to "scrub" a remote data island, but only for what belongs to the company. The IT department needs these tools to fulfill it's part of the mission in protecting corporate assets while meeting the desires of the social mission in allowing personally owned and customized technology for user convenience. (BYOD is a much abused meaningless catch-phrase, please quit using it)
Creating the built in separation of business and personal gives IT a standardized mechanism that we have have had to customize and crowbar wedge into devices before or just blanket take ownership and responsibility for the entire device.

 
So why is Blackberry upset? They have reliability issues due to the design of having everything go through their data-center. This channel has failed more than once. Lesson learned, single point of failure bad. The android mechanism provides a mechanism to "privatize" the key data synchronization into each enterprise's IT department or spread out the load across the massive Google data center architecture. This means much lower risk as a platform, and lower isolated failures (if a company has a server go down, no one else's businesses are affected) Versus, Every single hand-held in the market experiencing an outage of sync data because Blackberry data service centers are getting DDOS attacks.
 Yet if I was Blackberry, I would be nervous too; but rather than whining, I would look to learn from Google and build upon it.
mejiac
50%
50%
mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2014 | 3:50:58 PM
Re: Tears of lost glory
@Les,

to add to your comment, I think that fact that BB is lashing out at Google is evidence enough that they know they're in trouble. In the past they dominated there aspect of the industry, and now the only piece of the pie they have left, there are companies trying to get there hands on it....so it's of no surprise that Google is trying to gain traction in the enterprise.

 

I also agree that BB is one of those companies that'll be remember for it's successes and failures.
ATG4
50%
50%
ATG4,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/29/2014 | 11:52:11 AM
Managin BYOD
The BYOD concept can be intimidating for IT staff, but there are strategies to minimize security risks and device management headaches.  HTML5 technologies can allow users to connect to applications and systems without requiring IT staff to install anything on user devices. For example, Ericom AccessNow is an HTML5 RDP client that enables remote users to securely connect from iPads, iPhones and Android devices to any RDP host, including Terminal Server and VDI virtual desktops, and run their applications and desktops in a browser. This enhances security by keeping applications and data separate from personal devices.

Since AccessNow doesn't require any software installation on the end user device IT staff end up with less support hassles. Any user that brings in their own device merely opens their HTML5-compatible browser and connects to the URL given them by the IT admin.

Visit http://www.ericom.com/BYOD_Workplace for more info.

Please note that I work for Ericom
Ken.Dugdale
50%
50%
Ken.Dugdale,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/29/2014 | 11:34:43 AM
Re: Tears of lost glory
LIke you say Stratustician, those companies that allow the discussion to be around what employees choose to bring in from home, focusing on ease-of-experience over security, will sadly be those in the news most often with exposures of their intellectual property, customer or employee private data. I don't disagree that BYOD shapes policy - there's nothing new in a disruptive technology changing behavior - but it's sad to see some companies abandon policy alltogether in the interests of saving the cash that would buy their tethered employees a device. That's very short-term, pedestrian and dangerous thinking. Some companies will do that but it's no reason to think it's acceptable. Maybe they won't last long. I challenge the actual numbers of companies, Fortune 1000 companies, allowing "ANY" device. I suspect it's not as many as very small companies who nickel and dime their financial reports.  "If you think security is expensive, try going without."
Stratustician
50%
50%
Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2014 | 10:48:53 AM
Re: Tears of lost glory
While it's easy to focus on who has the better security offering, the real discussion will still be around what types of devices employees want to use.  If organizations have higher ratios of one mobile OS, that will most likely shape their security policies.  Whether the solution is as solid as another isn't sadly the main discussion anymore.
Ken.Dugdale
50%
50%
Ken.Dugdale,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/29/2014 | 10:35:56 AM
All devices are not equal.
I'd like to hear about battery life and responsiveness directly from people who own iPhones and Androids that have MDM clients on them and that have no hardware encryption chip. I've been told by many that their personally owned phones, that were not designed to run MDM 24/7, are slow and must be charged every six to eight hours. But I'd be posting hearsay in a forum so prefer real statistics. A device designed for the consumer doesn't usually fare well in corporate use, just as using your personal vehicle for a 40 hour work week proves not to be the best tool for the job. It's not  a simple matter of software upgrade.
Les Moor
50%
50%
Les Moor,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/29/2014 | 9:23:15 AM
Tears of lost glory
BYOD demands that IT support all of the devices.  BB can talk trash all it wants but after the major missteps it's made is it smart?  It will not shame consumers into buying its products, especially when their confidence in BB has been eroded, and may anger IT professionals.  There is a long history of products that disappeared because management made poor decisions.  BB is likely to be one of those.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
InformationWeek's IT Perception Survey seeks to quantify how IT thinks it's doing versus how the business really views IT's performance in delivering services - and, more important, powering innovation. Our results suggest IT leaders should worry less about whether they're getting enough resources and more about the relationships they have with business unit peers.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Must Reads Oct. 21, 2014
InformationWeek's new Must Reads is a compendium of our best recent coverage of digital strategy. Learn why you should learn to embrace DevOps, how to avoid roadblocks for digital projects, what the five steps to API management are, and more.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
A roundup of the top stories and trends on InformationWeek.com
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.