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IT Salaries: Looking For Love
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Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/30/2014 | 3:52:26 PM
Re: Re : IT Salaries: Looking For Love
@ProgMan: everybody has their own motivators, and I'm with you on the idea of not getting complacent or "settling." I do know some people though who hit their comfort zone and are perfectly content to toe the line there, and that's ok too if it works for them. What's interesting about looking at salaries is that we need to see salaries that are growing at well ahead of the rate of inflation in the U.S. because there's also our future retirements to consider. If we're not making enough to stay well ahead of the rate of inflation we'll be unable save the money needed to invest in our futures.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/30/2014 | 3:48:34 PM
Re: Re : IT Salaries: Looking For Love
@H-H: How one is treated in one's workplace, what the conditions are and the corporate culture, how one's workload compares to one's colleagues--these are all important influencers of satisfaction, not just with salaary but with the job overall. Even in the best-run companies, though, I wouldn't feel necessarily that someone whose treated well shouldn't expect to see their salary incrase, and I wouldn't begrudge anyone the chance to move to another company to better their salary situation.

In fact the InformationWeek salary suvey shows that seeking higher compensation is far and away the No. 1 reason for IT staff to leave their current jobs, ranking much higher than such intangibles as personal fulfillment or the chance to do more interesting work.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/30/2014 | 3:36:02 PM
Re: Re : IT Salaries: Looking For Love
@ProgMan: Our salary survey data doesn't do that sort of correlation, though I can tell you that the median number of years at the current company for IT staffers was 7, and the median number of years for IT managers was 8. Also, 68% of IT staff and 73% of IT management have only been at 1-2 jobs in the past 10 years. So it's safe to speculate that the majority of repsondnets in the salary survey have a fair amount of tenure in their organization.

The flash poll--because it is not as scientific -- would be much harder to pintpoint, though it's a valid topic for a followup.

To your larger rhetorical question: I suppose, no, nobody every really should be thoroughly satisfied with their salary. It's human nature to always strive for more, isn't it?
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
6/30/2014 | 3:25:00 PM
Re: Re : IT Salaries: Looking For Love
@SunitaT0: I suspected the rate of inflation to be the  main resason for salary dissatisfction. And, as you rightly point out, since our salary survey is specifically for the U.S. I only examined how those salary results compared to the U.S. rate of inflation. Our flash poll, however, was open to the entire InformationWeek audience, not just to U.S. so that could well explain the high rate of dissatisfaction. Do you feel also that non-cash benefits are hard to come by in India? I was shocked when I saw how few of our U.S. salary survey respondents were receiving any real perks beyond healthcare and 401K.
cafzali
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cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
6/30/2014 | 3:06:40 PM
Re: sadly, this tracks all industries too
@vnewman2 If I had to guess, it would likely involve a combination of lower job security, plus wage pressures brought about by offshoring. 

Across all industries, in many cases we've lost about 10 years of wage growth through the downturn. At the same time, expenses have continued going up for folks, which has resulted in a significant increase in pressure associated with jobs.

While things have improved, on the wage front, there's still a long way to go in many respects.
grcpro
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grcpro,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/30/2014 | 3:03:53 PM
My thoughts exactly...
While I am in the rather well-compensated end of the spectrum and not precisely dissatisfied with salary per se; the larger issue is that across industries/professions in US we are increasingly asked to do less with more. We are held accountable without adequate resources. Every project is priority one and that lack of realistic prioritization and effective leadership results in constant fire drills and finger-pointing politics. There is no consideration for work/life balance [beyond lip service], and cash is expected to compensate for being on call 24x7x365 resulting in constant stress that detracts from health, happiness and enjoyment of what little family/personal time we have. At a certain point no amount of money is worth it. Yet convrsely, we, "the lucky ones" feel imprisoned by the golden handcuffs of our compensation [pay/benefits/options] package. I know this may sound ungrateful, but the fact is compensation is not just about salary--there is a bigger picture.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2014 | 2:18:53 PM
Re: sadly, this tracks all industries too
What else am I missing? What's making so many IT workers dissatisfied? Personally, and probably like most other people in "service" related industries, no amount of money can make up for the politics, bureacracy, and lack of respect from the people you are trying to help.
cafzali
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cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
6/30/2014 | 1:46:00 PM
sadly, this tracks all industries too
I'd wager surveys around salaries in most any industry would uncover a similar amount of discontent. And when you look at the latest research that shows that while we've regained the jobs lost during the recession, we're still years away from regaining the lost earning power, the discontent is likely to continue. 

Sadly, there have been a relatively few years over the last 20 when, unless you had a very specialized skill, you were in the driver's seat as a job seeker or employee. 
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2014 | 12:19:12 PM
Re:IT Salaries: Looking For Love
I think overseas IT salaries have hit a major low in recent times, to cope up with inflation, but hasn't been quite able to do so. Moreover, since the cost of living in the states (including the new bracket of taxes levied by the Obama government) have gone up, people are finding their 100k salary inadequate. But the eastern IT people have it far worse. They are paid a base salary that looks little when compared to the salary of the US IT people and real estate prices have gone up in these developing countries, and the salaries paid by their companies aren't enough to feel satisfied about.
sferguson10001
IW Pick
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sferguson10001,
User Rank: Moderator
6/30/2014 | 10:15:58 AM
Bonus
@Susan: Does either the salary survey or the reader poll take into account the issue of bonuses? While many people are often unhappy with their base salary, the bonus usually helps add something to the bottom line at the end of the year. Since bonuses are taxed like income, it can feel like you're short changed, but it's still additional income. 
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