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Windows XP Stayin' Alive
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Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2014 | 10:06:22 AM
Re: overlooked xp
That's a pretty interesting idea. The market is certainly open for someone to step in, but whether Microsoft would allow the kind of low level access likely needed to maintain the operating system is another thing altogether. 
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2014 | 9:23:35 AM
Re: overlooked xp
This is  a good but tricky question. In my opinion old car is not fullly comparable to Windows XP. For old car, you need regular maintenance and repair if you want to  keep it functioning. For Windows XP, you can let it run almost forever,  assume that you don't  care about the security holes. I am not sure if MS will support any 3rd party vendor to provide certain kind of limited support to XP. But I suppose the answer is most  likely "No".
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
7/2/2014 | 6:08:28 AM
Re: overlooked xp
So is it time to treat an OS like a car? I can still get my 56 Chevy fixed in an aftermarket mode, but not by the manufacturer. Who is dropping the ball here? MSFT or anoher company which can come along and support XP with MSFT's help?
anon7449354690
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anon7449354690,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/2/2014 | 1:27:42 AM
overlooked xp
XP is in use by a lot of point of sale systems and proprietary hardware systems that are kept on private networks, so they don't require internet update support.  XP is still very popular in India, which has a lot of people in it who often pirate that OS.  XP continued to be used in Virtual Machine session hosts that again, do not interact much with the internet, nor have any need for new hardware drivers.  I know of many companies that block internet access for employees and run private email servers, so their employee workstations manage just fine on XP, as do most public libraries continue to run XP and as their card member workstations are read only, and set to wipe any storage and block program installs, they manage fine on XP and have no budget to upgrade.
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
7/1/2014 | 7:19:39 PM
Re: resilient
Agree, that the stats are pretty startling -- may say more about Microsoft and a large company's ability to be a trend setter.


Would like the stats to tell me what percentage of people use it in a business setting and personal setting. And how embedded it is into how a company runs.

I have a few friends who have not upgraded from XP. All they do is send email and use AOL. And for that, XP works fine.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
7/1/2014 | 6:55:48 PM
Re: resilient
How many of XP users are actually actively using it? Aren't many corporate machines that have XP out of inertia?
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/1/2014 | 5:41:06 PM
Re: resilient
Why dump a perfectly functional piece of hardware? We have several XP-era PCs that work just fine. Now, we did move to Win 7, but even if we hadn't I suspect they'd be chugging along.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
7/1/2014 | 5:00:29 PM
Re: resilient
Very true. While some people are on XP out of negligence or obliviousness, many are on it for other reasons, ranging from financial considerations, to XP actually being well-suited (Microsoft support or not) for their needs. Still, it's mind-boggling how many users it still has!
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
7/1/2014 | 4:53:41 PM
resilient
"You've got to hand it to people who still use Windows XP -- they're a resolute bunch"
It's not that we are all that resolute, sometimes we don't have many choices; or people don't know any better, even with the annoying end of support box popping up every so often.

I'm guilty of installing (recently, I might add) XP on old computers'laptops. I tried with Linux, but old computers don't get along very well with new Linux distros, or people just don't like it.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/1/2014 | 4:39:44 PM
Chore Avoidance
I think people just look at an OS upgrade as something between an unpleasant chore (for more technical types) and a terrifying ordeal that could end up with their PC being a doorstop. It just makes sense to upgrade an OS at the same time you buy new hardware, and those systems are presumably working just fine. 

A crashed hard drive or broken display is more likely than security warnings to make people drop XP.
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