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Geekend: A Tiptoe Through Kickstarter
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David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/8/2014 | 1:41:44 PM
Re: regarding the helmet
@soozyg- Well, I get that, I suppose, if you assume that it can do more than it can do. For instance, if you thought it could steal your passwords or something.

But an EEG shouldn't hurt your brain. In a way, all they are is super sensitive volt meters. They measure the electrical signals from the scalp. And they can't pick out details. Only the aggregate which means things like mood.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/8/2014 | 1:37:22 PM
Re: Ricky the cockroach
I think that crowdfunding is a great way to see if an idea can get traction with people. But I am wary of it as an investment vehicle. If some of these ideas are so good, then why did traditional investors turn them down?


@danielcawrey- Well, i think the quickest answer to your question is that 12 publishers passed on Harry Potter. Even experts don't always see the value in somehting.

But a longer answer is that i don't think Kickstarter is an investment site. I think of it more as a preview site. You get to buy somehting before it is out. If you are an investor, you get a stake in the company. If you are on Kickstarter, at most, you get the product or a thankyou card or a t-shirt or whatever.

I can see 250 people buying the Qwerkywriter, but I can't see Qwerkywriter selling so many copies an investor would want a stake in the company unless they thought the guy who made them had a bunch of similar ideas.

For a VC to be interested, he needs to see thousands if not millions of dollars in an idea. For a Kickstarter to work, all someone needs to see is a few bucks or a product they'd liek to buy.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/8/2014 | 1:32:21 PM
Re: Exo
@Rich- Hrm...not exactly the best use of the forums here. But if it is legit, it is a concept worth funding. I've covered various exoskeletons and brain controlled devices for several years. It seems like we're getting really close. I'm blown away by it.

I wonder if we'll notice interesting consequences when we start using mind control for non-body part devices. For instance, when I play Candy Crush, i will often make a move and then my eye will see something it should have seen before and I'll wish I could take the move back. How would that work if you had a mind controlled car? I want to turn right, no left! *crash*

Would speeding up our mechanical world around us to the speed of thought make the whole thing go out of whack or would we work more smoothly?
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/8/2014 | 1:27:05 PM
Re: Ricky the cockroach
@jastro- Silly, jastro, no one keeps bodies in the attic anymore. When the zombie apocolypse comes, your house isn't safe. :)

The best thing to do with the bodies of your loved ones is to get rid of the bodies with acid like in Breaking Bad. No evidence and they don't come back as zombies. Look at what we learn from TV.

David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/8/2014 | 1:22:44 PM
Re: Ricky the cockroach
@vnewman2- It works because both cockroaches and 2nd hand smoke cause childhood asthma so we should make both. :)



I was intrigued by the statement at the end: I can't help but wonder, what kind of mistakes has the author made in life?? I'd give some money to find out...


Maybe you should offer to kickstart her autobiography instead. :)
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/8/2014 | 7:20:53 AM
Re: Ricky the cockroach
@vnewman2, That's probably a good guess.  I know people who have great ideas but don't go anywhere with them because it's more trouble than they want to deal with.  Kickstarter puts the control back in their hands and lets them work at a pace that they are comfortable with so I can see the draw in contrast to submitting ideas to a traditional investor.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
7/7/2014 | 2:50:33 PM
Re: Ricky the cockroach
@danielcawrey

 "If some of these ideas are so good, then why did traditional investors turn them down?"

I'm guessing that no one had previously turned them down because they probably never went do traditional investors in the first place, either because a. most people wouldn't know how to secure investment capital in a traditional sense and b. why would you bother if you can post something to the internet and perhaps achieve the same end almost instantaneously.

That's my guess...
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
7/7/2014 | 10:23:26 AM
Re: A Tiptoe Through Kickstarter
I was wondering when we'd get a bona-fide Kickstater-themed Geekend post. You've certainly written about crowdfunding before, Dave (it's a hard topic not to), but I was hoping we'd get to jump in the deep end sooner or later. Here we are, although I suppose we could go a lot deeper than this - there's some pretty crazy stuff out there, and Kickstarter can be a fickle and mystifying place. Sure, Ricky the cockroach might not be the best idea, but 0 dollars? And the typewriter keyboard got $130,000... and the mind-reading helmet that could change the world got $12,000? There's a lesson about human nature in here.

It's no secret that video games are a big draw on Kickstarter, and the Geekend seems like as good a place as any for a tie-in on that subject. The Ouya (which I own) famously raised 8 million  dollars on Kickstarter, and then subsequently came out and more or less sucked the big one (I still have mixed feelings about mine). My nominee for craziest game Kickstarter has to be 'bob's game' ; in development for the better part of ten years and supposedly made by just one guy (named Bob), the game has a storied history of 'viral' (or terrible) marketing, setbacks, and crazy rants from the developer all leading to people questioning if the game ever even existed. Yet, somehow, Bob managed to raise $10,000 for the game on Kickstarter just this May... and has since gone radio silent. I'd love to play the game, but at this point I'm having fun just watching the story unfold.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/7/2014 | 7:27:12 AM
Re: Ricky the cockroach
I don't see Kickstarter as much of an investment vehicle.  Most of the funds I see put in to a Kickstarter project are to buy the actual product should it get enough funding to pull off.  I've made one off items to solve problems around the house because I hate paying people to do things that are relatively easy or I have someone shock me with what they say it will cost to service an item.  Could I mass produce and sell some of those items, probably.  Can I afford to build thousands of units in the hopes that they will sell, not even remotely.  So that is where I see the strength of Kickstarter, people will ideas that won't require too much funding but more than they can easily pull out of pocket to start a company.
soozyg
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
7/6/2014 | 10:26:35 PM
city planning?
"One of the potential long-term goals could be to collect the information anonymously and see how city layouts affect way of life or how public spaces could be better designed to improve well-being."

What if your reactions have nothing to do with the place you're in? Suppose you feel stress because you're in a rush to get your child and then happiness/relief when you find a great parking spot. Would those two brain readings are a result of your personal life, not related to the city. Would that really help with city planning?
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