Comments
Too Old To Earn Big In IT?
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 7   >   >>
impactnow
50%
50%
impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
7/12/2014 | 2:38:04 AM
The age ceiling

 

Susan you raise an interesting point regarding the natural career trajectory. I would love to compare the stats you provided with other functional areas in an organization, I suspect the results might appear similar. Ageism, is not exclusive to IT but has become part of the corporate culture for many organizations that career path employees to a certain age and then let them remain in that role or release them. I have known many associates who have seen their careers plateau at mid-forties age group and they are in many divergent functional areas. There seems to be that age ceiling where only lateral moves are available that no one wants to discuss.

Technocrati
50%
50%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/11/2014 | 10:27:51 PM
Re: Know the Law

@S,N,     Thank you for passing on that unbelievable ( believable ) account of what happened to a colleague of yours.    I had not even considered the implications that you mention, and it is sombering to think an allegation like this before even decided by a impartial third party would get out to the Net.  

 

That is really frightening.  I certainly feel for him and I am glad he was able to get back to his career.  It reminds me of the time I  once had a boss  who I was on friendly terms with, one day just out of the blue as we sat at our workstations talking, he just decide to drop my name in Google search to see what would come up.   Thankfully nothing did, but it is the fact that it is just that easy to have your entire career ruined over an plain lie.

Google needs to expand their efforts in this regard, they have lost in Europe over this I believe and it is high time this industry's leading search engine bear some responsibility ( especially in terms of Libel ) for the results it posts.

And I agree with your points about the reasons someone does or does not sue.  Word gets around quickly and if you are in a small industry, it could mean moving on.  A personal choice for each individual of course,  I have been faced with it a few times and I have been forced to be a pragmatist about the entire situation - in order to fight another day.

Susan_Nunziata
50%
50%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/11/2014 | 2:33:38 PM
Re: Know the Law
@Technocrati: Anyone who brings a lawsuit against their employer has to consider very carefully the impact it might have on their future employment prospects. It takes great courage to stand up and fight discrimination at the risk of harming one's own long term potential.

I suspect that a great many people put up with discrimination and harassment until they can find a new job rather than taking legal action simply out of fear.

Likewise, lawsuits can harm the innocent. A former colleague of mine was named in a sexual harassment lawsuit brought by a former employee of that company, and the allegations against him were appalling and untrue. In the U.S., you can pretty much say anything in a lawsuit and it becomes a matter of public record. So my former colleague's name was all over the Internet as being accused of doing these awful things that he did not do.

Ultimately, a judge dismissed him by name from the law suit, and eventually the whole suite was thrown out.

But the news that his name was cleared never made it to the top of Google searches, so anytime he looked for a job the first 3 pages of Google talked about the horrible accusations. It took him about 3 years to find new fulltime emplyment.

 

 
Susan_Nunziata
50%
50%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/11/2014 | 2:27:02 PM
Re: Wisdom comes with time
@SusanF: Thank you for doing the additional research on this topic. While it's not specific to age, I found this to be really interesting as a highlighted difference between our hetergeneous corporate culture in the U.S. and the more homogenous corporate culture of Japan:

Basically a Japanese company is organized by Japanese.  Almost everyone has same background to realize the situation so some of the understanding is in unspoken words. This is one of the important communication skills in Japan.

I think in the U.S. we all too often miss, or misunderstand, what is being communicated by what the author calls unspoken words. Subtlety is definitely not a strong suit in U.S. corporate culture!
Susan_Nunziata
50%
50%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/11/2014 | 2:20:33 PM
Re: The IDEA field of dreams
@SaneIT: it's a tricky situation, because you'd like to make sure there's room for all personality types in any organization, that sort of diversity leads to better performance in my opinion. though the expectation in most businesses is that you need to be assertive to survive.

I'm reading a fantastic book called "Quiet: The power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking." The book's author discusses how most businsses favor the extrovert and overlook the value of the introvert. Her research shows that an organiztion that can accommodate both personality types is stronger for it.

Here's a link to the author's site, where you'll also find a video of her TED Talk on the topic:

http://www.thepowerofintroverts.com/about-the-book/
Susan_Nunziata
50%
50%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/11/2014 | 2:11:10 PM
Re: Too Old To Earn BIg In IT
@vnewman2: True. Increased awareness of the issue cuts both ways. And older workers tend to not only have higher salary bases, they also tend to have more vacation time available to them, and may possibly be more of a burden on the employee healthcare plan, all of which are technically illegal reasons to dismiss someone but are probably taken into consideration when it's time for a company to do cost-cutting layoffs.

Not that anyone would ever admit to this, of course...and it's virtually impossible to prove, since most companies are careful to include enough people from all groups that they can't be subject to a class action suit.
Susan_Nunziata
50%
50%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/11/2014 | 2:08:26 PM
Re: There's always
@TarryB: I give you credit for being able to view this in such a logical way. Your sport analogy is apt, as it would be for any job that requires a level of physical prowess. However, I'm not sure the same is true for jobs that involve knowledge and intellect. If it were the case, then we might be able to also argue that someone who is physically handicapped at any age can't perform as well as someone who is physically well, even if their mental capabilities are equal.

I have trouble separating my emotional response from the facts of running a business, and so my tendency would be to shout: But of course someone at age 56 deserves the same retraining opportunities as someone aged 36!!

It's all a matter of perspective, I suppose.

One other factor to consider here: Typically as a persona ages, the amount of personal responsibility they have increases. They're often caring for children, caring for aging parents, owning a home, etc.

And so, I wonder, is the question about energy of young versus old not so much a matter of older folks not being able to keep up with young energy, but rather a matter of mounting family obligations that make it impossible to have the 24/7 focus on a job that someone in their 20s or 30s offer simply becuase their life is less complicated?

 
Susan_Nunziata
50%
50%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/11/2014 | 1:56:23 PM
Re: Raise
@mak63: your experience mirrors my own, that's why I was curious. I did the same thing: Jumped ship for a salary increase instead of talking to my boss about it first. And I ended up landing at a job that made me miserable until I was able to get out. Lesson learned, for sure. And I've since taken assertiveness and negotiation training to help me in the future next time I'm faced with making a career/salary move.
Susan_Nunziata
50%
50%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/11/2014 | 1:54:16 PM
Re: Age discrimination DOES exist
@danielcawrey: There's plenty of speculation we can make about why folks in IT hit this earnings plateau after they reach a certain age, and no way to truly prove any of the theories. One thing we also have to consider is that not everyone wants to climb the corporate ladder. For some, I imagine, they're happy with the career point they have reached and are ok with being there regardless of their age.
mak63
50%
50%
mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
7/9/2014 | 6:21:44 PM
Re: Raise
@Susan

Looking back, I'd say it was all on me. I closed the door to even talk about a raise without even know what the director's response would be. You can call it lack of courage and a clear vision what the future will be like without this job.
<<   <   Page 2 / 7   >   >>


IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
InformationWeek's IT Perception Survey seeks to quantify how IT thinks it's doing versus how the business really views IT's performance in delivering services - and, more important, powering innovation. Our results suggest IT leaders should worry less about whether they're getting enough resources and more about the relationships they have with business unit peers.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest September 24, 2014
Start improving branch office support by tapping public and private cloud resources to boost performance, increase worker productivity, and cut costs.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.