Comments
Internet of Things Done Wrong Stifles Innovation
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
yalanand
50%
50%
yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 4:18:36 PM
Re: Internet of Things Done Wrong Stifles Innovation
@Laurianne: We do know that there should be standards enforcing for the IOT, and a lot of organisations (including IEEE) are getting their feet into this sector. However there seems to be too many standards everyone is proposing (and this is normal since IOT is new and everybody wants to make profit hence everyone is proposing standards that give their device architecture the leading edge in the market) and therefore we need dedicated standardizations for each subheading under the heading of IOT.
yalanand
50%
50%
yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 4:17:54 PM
IOT security challenges
IOT security challenges are really great, but come with ample amounts of rewards. Since IOT is still expanding, there is still a chance for making errors and resolving them without much after-effect. Naked networks are a seriously big problem and that needs to be solved, without which whatever security IOT may have (in cloud space and also as device security) it?ll get broken eventually.
gev
50%
50%
gev,
User Rank: Moderator
7/10/2014 | 9:07:35 AM
Security updates for IoT?
So far it is proving very hard to get the latest updates on the Android phones in a timely manner. Your connected toaster will be a sitting duck in half a year without patches. And the more devices will become connected in your home, the more you will turn into IT department, spending your time on tracking versions and managing patches. Good luck and have fun.
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/8/2014 | 11:58:13 AM
Re: Internet of Things Done Wrong Stifles Innovation
I am curious to get Frank's take on who has the financial incentive to create the IoT gadget standards. I agree that we need them, but I don't see who will spearhead it. Look at where we stand with retailers and credit card companies. In a financial standoff about costs of upgrading cards and systems.
zerox203
50%
50%
zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
7/8/2014 | 1:08:20 AM
Re: Internet of Things Done Wrong Stifles Innovation

Thanks for this, Frank. IoT is a hot topic these days (I feel like I'm seeing more and more articles on the front page of InformationWeek every day), and it's easy to see why. It has the potential to positively affect our everyday lives... and negatively affect them, as you rightly point out, which gets people passionate and talking about it. It also lights our sc-fi loving nerd hearts on fire with all the crazy possibilities that could happen, which doesn't hurt. Still, there are very real and practical concerns that bear talking about before we get in over our heads, not after.

In my humble opinion, regulations are an inherently iffy topic when it comes to IoT. After all, all 'IoT' really means is 'an internet-connected computer inside a device that's not a computer' (or, devices that don't already normally have computers in them). So that brings up the questions of:

1) How can you regulate that? You can't really tell manufacturers what they are and aren't allowed to ship for IoT any more than anywhere else. It's up to the consumers to buy it or not.

2) Who's to say existing laws/regulations don't already apply to these devices - and, if so, who decides which ones and how they're adhered to?

3) Why would manufacturers do any more work than they have to? Pontificating that 'we shouldn't cut corners' never really caused anybody not to, did it? They're trying to get stuff to market ASAP... and many won't do anything not absolutely required.



ChrisMurphy
100%
0%
ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
7/7/2014 | 3:14:11 PM
Re: All about motive
Tom, I could agree with your statement that "most of what machines have to tell us isn't that valuable." But the exception -- the breakdown, the leak, the absence of breathing -- can be extraordinarily valuable. That's stuff that companies can put a price on, and decide if the cost of collecting the data is worth the pay off. 
Ali Alkhafaji
100%
0%
Ali Alkhafaji,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/7/2014 | 3:02:42 PM
We always find a way..
The scariest part about innovation isn't just the speed but the acceleration as well. Innovation becomes faster every moment and constant adaptation is no longer an advantage but a requirement. However, even as security, safety and adaptation are far behind innovation, we always find a way to get there. Mind you there will be quite a few hiccups along the way that will call for urgency in getting those three up to speed.
Lorna Garey
100%
0%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/7/2014 | 2:57:21 PM
Re: All about motive
Sure, in a high-end neighborhood or where you know the home contains valuable, portable and easily sellable items.

However, again, lacking that certainty, you're doing a fair amount of work with no guarantee of a payoff, and adding the possibility of the homeowner having a big dog -- or being a fan of the second amendment and castle doctrine. Just not seeing widespread feasibility. 

 
Shane M. O'Neill
100%
0%
Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
7/7/2014 | 2:55:42 PM
Re: All about motive
One unsettling scenario: Sophisticated hackers teaming up with lower level burglers to hack into houses, swipe valuables, and share the spoils. Makes me very hesitant to ever have a home alarm system that's IoT-connected
DonQ765
100%
0%
DonQ765,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/7/2014 | 2:42:03 PM
Re: All about motive
Unless the reward is hacking a home owners garage door opener or smart locks...hack the home, steal the property
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Nov. 10, 2014
Just 30% of respondents to our new survey say their companies are very or extremely effective at identifying critical data and analyzing it to make decisions, down from 42% in 2013. What gives?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.