Comments
Big Data: No Hoarding Allowed
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StuartCarey
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StuartCarey,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/8/2014 | 5:42:52 AM
Not Applicable to everything
Although a very interesting read, this is not always applicable to everything, such as senstive data sets (ie; Healthcare and NHS Where I work in the UK).

I tend to keep everything to allow us to do a previous year by year comparison on growth of a subject and more. Ie; 2 years ago there was no "SOP" in place, and now there is, this has been the change in data.

 
zaious
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zaious,
User Rank: Moderator
7/7/2014 | 11:19:21 PM
Re: Theory vs. reality
Playing it safe (storing all) is okay to a certain point -this keeps one risk free. However, it will be gone since the amount of data generation is increasing and it will require more to store. Humans are ,by nature, hoarders. At the same time it is tough to take the courage and hit the 'Delete' and confirm 'Yes'. 
Doug Henschen
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Doug Henschen,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/7/2014 | 3:35:23 PM
Re: Theory vs. reality
Another opinion on big data from a self-interested vendor. Atkinson's "cost millions to data warehouse" perspective is a little dated. And the example he offers, tied to structured transactional data, is also not a very "big data" frame of reference.

The point of aggregating to the hour instead of the second is simple enough -- conventional wisdom, really. But this seems like a very conventional frame of reference focused on developing analytics based on recency, frequency, and monetary value. What about variable data types like clickstreams, log files, or social data? That's when data gets really big. It's not just a matter of collecting more of the same old data. 
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
7/7/2014 | 1:55:27 PM
Re: Theory vs. reality
If only someone could convince the NSA of the merits of not hoarding data.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/7/2014 | 1:47:24 PM
Theory vs. reality
It's all great in theory. However, to save selectively requires effort and will -- data classification programs, someone to decide to delete X set and take the fall if it's needed someday, etc. Meanwhile, storage is cheap and getting cheaper.


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