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Tech Leaders On Speed Vs. Risk: InformationWeek Video
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David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
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7/8/2014 | 9:49:18 AM
Requires incredible discipline
The Netflix approach is impressive because it requires a lot of discipline to break functionality down into such atomic units. I think the more natural instinct for a developer is to create in bigger chunks.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
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7/8/2014 | 11:27:05 AM
Fast Works
I expect more CEOs will follow Immelt's lead and demand a "Fast Works" approach as well. As for Cockcroft, he really seems to have given the developers rock star status inside Netflix, while effectively merging IT and business ops. He argues others can make this cultural leap too -- if they have the will. 
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
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7/8/2014 | 2:17:11 PM
For every GE there are many Kodaks
For every company like GE -- going out of its way to embrace disruption -- there are all too many Kodaks. Kodak actually invented a lot of the patents around digital photography, but it couldn't get out of its own way and ended up in bankruptcy. The film business was too seductive a cash cow. The printer business was (and still seems to be) the hoped-for way to recreate the old razor-blade model (even though HP, Canon, Lexmark and others already had the market well covered).

We'll see if Fowler can bring this IOT model over to GE Finance. Seems like they have good headway on industrial innovation, but financial innovation is likely to be a different animal.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
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7/9/2014 | 2:36:58 PM
Re: Requires incredible discipline
David, it definitely is a change in mentality to only develop that new feature, and to make everything else a common, reuseable service. But it's not just the developer, it's having an infrastructure that makes that service re-use feasible and practical.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2014 | 1:34:24 PM
Re: Tech Leaders On Speed VS. Risk
Thanks for this, Chris. All these recaps from the InformationWeek Conference (a great event which is news to me) are really well-done and the videos are well cut together. After all, IT people aren't always known for being the most talkative bunch, and sometimes they're more excited to get off stage than to share their innovations (I know I'm in this camp!). You guys do a great a job of asking the right questions and making sure you capture the important bits. Indeed, we've had a handful or articles just on these processes at GE and Netflix alone, but I feel like I'm learning something new or getting a different take every time.

It is true that smaller organisations iell have trouble replicating the muscle or finances of a GE or a Netflix, but that doesn't mean they can't replicate the agility. Indeed, it seems like GE is going out of it's way to take a page out of smaller organisations' playbooks with some of these changes. Sometimes, breakind down walls (in terms of processes and so forth) that we've had for such a long time sometimes makes us wonder what we needed them for in the first place. The chart from Mr. Cockcroft makes it seem pretty straightforward - why go through fives teams when you could go through three? However, for your individual organization, it's important to decide which two are the ones that are unnecessary and which processes you'd be better off without - it doesn't mean to axe everything.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Moderator
7/30/2014 | 4:19:55 PM
SPEED vs. RISK
This particular thing seems to be a headache for every manager out there, and in a market where speed is of utmost importance, the risk management is also important because in the end, customer safety (both physical and digital) guarantees market forces. Some companies create the most secure software but in low volumes, and they also take the pinch when it comes to market leading attributes. GE is finding new tactics to set the graph between risk and speed a constant slope for a long time to come.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Moderator
7/30/2014 | 4:20:32 PM
Re: For every GE there are many Kodaks
@D. Henschen: Finance management is tough when there are so many resources at your disposal and you?ve got so many subsidiaries to take into account. Financial innovation requires marketing models and risk management that can get the better of any marketing analyst. Therefore what GE does (according to this article) is create low number teams of marketing analysts and gives them a lesser time frame, while the risk management is given to another department.


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