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Google CEO: Fight Unemployment With Job Sharing
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MarylandMike
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MarylandMike,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 1:42:59 PM
Job Sharing is not the answer
At first, I thought this article was a throw-back from 1955 when computers would make 'ordinary' work disappear.  That didn't happen and neither will the current evolution of job sharing.  I don't know about the rest of the world, but in the US, when you hire someone part-time (e.g. 20 hours/week) they are not eligible for 401k, vacation, paid sick leave, or medical/dental/vision insurance.  So, not only have you cut my salary in 1/2, you have removed any incentive that companies now offer.

CEOs can talk about this new model but they seem to forget that not everyone is a 'desk' job.  The plumbers, electricians, service workers of the world will still be working full time because anything less puts them at a poverty level.

 
AlanE728
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AlanE728,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 1:42:31 PM
Who pays my mortgage?
This is from the leader of one of the largest corporations in the world?  So I do half my job, get paid half my salary, does that mean Mr. Page will pay half of my mortgage and half of my bills?  Or do I get foreclosed, evicted from my house and live on the street so Mr. Page's Utopian vision can proceed? Can I get half of a McDonalds job then?  I guess Mr. Page doesn't really mind because if he shares his job (yeah I'm sure that will happen) he still will bring in HALF a gazillion dollars, so why should he care?  I'm really trying to get out from under Google's thumb, but it does seem near impossible
zaious
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zaious,
User Rank: Moderator
7/9/2014 | 1:37:40 PM
Re: Job sharing doesn't have to be 2 for 1
A copmay might offer, "Look, I cen get another employee to work with your group of 5 people. Your workload will decrease, but your pay will go down by 20%" Will anyone agree? It is getting difficult for people to save for retirement funds these days. Creation of jibs has to come through some other way.

Again, it is true that many companies reduced theri workforce but the workload is , essentially, the same. This is a kind of burden on existing emplyees.
Henrisha
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Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/9/2014 | 1:24:32 PM
Re: Job sharing doesn't have to be 2 for 1
It is more idealistic than realistic or practical. In this day and age where you can get cheaper labor elsewhere, where jobs and money and budgets are tight, and everyone is just looking to scrimp. Don't even get me started on outsourcing.
Henrisha
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Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/9/2014 | 1:23:36 PM
Re: Job sharing doesn't have to be 2 for 1
Unfortunately, for most firms, higher revenue > happy employees, so unless some great shift comes that'll convince upper management to sign off on that and get more people for job sharing, then I don't see that happening just yet.
anon8304916915
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anon8304916915,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 1:22:37 PM
Obstacles to Techno-Utopia
So the only obstacle to job-sharing and techno-utopia is the high cost of housing?

Even the Soviets were able to provide affordable housing to their workers.

Unfortunately though, it isn't an engineering problem.

It is a political problem called Proposition 13.
JasonO599
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JasonO599,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 12:57:54 PM
Re: Yeah Sue...
"I notice there was no suggestion that, to help with ongoing diminution of pay for the average worker, the CEO's should pay share. "

Market forces say that a CEO is harder to replace than a worker bee. And if you add all the IP and secrets in the mix, a company that does not pay its CEO riskes the danger of losing serious competitive advantage. 

I am not a big believer in such a pay disparity and it does seem unethical, but large companies do have a dilema if they want top leadership talent. The best solution is that consumers stop buying products for these type of companies and patron other companies. 
anon6027605817
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anon6027605817,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 12:57:43 PM
Re: Job sharing could work in some instances
Exactly.

The model I'm thinking of is you have 2 100% unemployed people.  If the job is right, they both could work 50% which is better then 0% and still come out ahead and bring in more than an unemployment check. This also gives them the opportunity to get their foot in the door.  This is also attractive to stay at home parents who want to ease back into the workforce.

I can see how employers could abuse this and make all jobs 50% to save on benefits. That would suck, but they would run the risk of losing their entire employee base.

Make it an option like 4/10 and 3.5/12
JasonO599
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JasonO599,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 12:53:17 PM
Re: Propagate wealth at the low end of the income scale
"Some innovations concentrate wealth, and some propagate wealth. "

Great point, thanks for that. The not so humorous thing is that laize faire types always talk about the latter but not the former. I am pro technology and a capitalist, however I do realize there are limitations and if we aren't open about these limitations and how they effect our society in the next 10 years, we may be in for a rude awakening. 
JasonO599
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JasonO599,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 12:49:49 PM
Re: Disconnected...
"If you cut the work week to 20 hours and halve the salary, the talented will just get two jobs.  Effect on unemployment -- zero."

Some will get a job, but many will freelance and start their own business, so the effect is much greater than you illustrate. 
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