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Google CEO: Fight Unemployment With Job Sharing
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wnsrfr
IW Pick
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wnsrfr,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2014 | 11:28:11 AM
All you that are hating on this present no alternatives
I've read Lights in the Tunnel and many other books like it.

In 1977 an art professor of mine and Vermont philosopher that I highly respected suggested job sharing as something in our future--always remembered that.

There are obvious challenges, most highly our competitive nature that makes reduced hours a difficult proposition along with the need to maintain free market effectiveness.

But the "free market" still operates within many rules and boundaries today...our future challenge is to find a way to reduce hours (to facilitate job sharing) while maintaining income levels and encouraging competition and success.

One piece of the puzzle may be to tax automation much like value added taxes are employed in other countries.  But the tax will not go to the government but will be earmarked to all employees of the company taxed. 

Another piece--recognizing the value of job sharing on a social level.  Sure, pie in the sky, but it has worked to increase our recycling rates and over time being someone that participates in job sharing may be the new cool.

Something is needed.  Classic economic theory that automation just shifts jobs to new opportunities is like the frog in the pot at minute 5..."the water got warmer earlier, and no harm resulted, so no harm will occur in the future!"
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2014 | 10:52:52 AM
Removed
As trend setting as a lot of the businesses these guys head are, the problem of being so far removed from everyday financial worries is that you simply cannot appreciate the day to day hardships of people that aren't in your bubble. 

As idealistic as the idea of having more time off and onyl working part time, as the article points out, unless we're suddenly earning a lot more per hour than before, I don't see how it could ever work. 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2014 | 5:51:02 AM
Re: Here's Reality For You
Interesting dynamics at play -- a few companies have an interest in technology to be implemented, while on the other hand, a few companies don't want technology to be implemented because it might hurt their profit margins.

Economics solves many of these problems, it allows for a process to bring into widespread adoption the technologies that are cheaper for everyone. Fuel Cells are good but when compared to Natural Gas, it can cost around three times as much to produce hydrogen that can be implemented in a Fuel Cell to deliver energy, infrastructure (filling stations, etc.) requirements that would be needed to support a Fuel Cell automotive industry is another concern.

Sometimes it is easy for the incumbent to advance to a more efficient technology, but decides not to because they fear that their customers will not be able to match the investment needed from the customers end. For example, 220v AC distribution systems are more efficient compared to 110v, and power distribution companies would only need to upgrade their last mile (transformers). However, consumers will have to convert all of their appliances that run on 110v into appliances that accept 220v.  
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2014 | 5:12:53 AM
Re: Yeah Sue...
Good point, the planet does not have infinite resources to produce an infinite supply of shoes. I think as new materials are discovered shoes might become hybrid, for example, a flat would be able to convert into a heeled shoe and vise-vasa. There are already Nano materials that are being applied to the exterior of shoes, this helps to keep the shoe to look like new and makes cleaning it easier. However, such advances are just going to decrease long term demand for new shoes.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
7/10/2014 | 4:50:19 AM
Re: Yeah Sue...
Interesting point about the trade-offs that companies need to make in deciding the salaries of their CEO. I guess, as the job of the CEO becomes diluted and other C-suites become an absolute necessity in every company, this could cause the average salary to increase, while decreasing the CEO's salary -- much like splitting the CEO's job responsibilities from a one person show to a team effort.
cafzali
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cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
7/9/2014 | 10:59:41 PM
Re: Revolution = Non-Participation
A revolution takes a ton of organization -- so much so that we haven't had anything resembling it since the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s.
eagle94
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eagle94,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 9:22:40 PM
Re: Nice Joke
I did very welll the last three years,averaging over 800,OOO. Approximately 4% came from investments while the remainder from my small business I pay 9% state and 39.5% federal. I write off my home mortgage and a couple of other minor deductions. Maybe 40k when all said. Please explain how I can get to an effective tax rate of 11%. Because I feel very foolish paying so much.
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
7/9/2014 | 6:47:45 PM
Re: Sharing work a future necessity
It's a unique concept, not totally new when you think of shift work where many folks share responsibilities.  I wonder if this will change the overall business hours, since when you think about it, we are going to be moving towards a truly global economy, which means supporting all time zones.
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
7/9/2014 | 6:33:15 PM
Sharing work a future necessity
In the future people will share work both by necessity and choice. They'll try to compensate for the limits on income by finding ways to forestall some of the costs of modern life. They will barter for skills and services with friends and through online exchanges. They'll use more computer skills to attend class, shop and recreate. They'll also spend more time training youth to use components to build their own basic electronics -- computer, music player, phone. They'll work growing food, fixing bikes, repairing a window or roof, generating energy. In the necessity of doing so, they'll end up doing something else they always meant to do -- live and work more closely together, proliferating local skills and founding neighborhood businesses. But it probably won't work out without first encountering painful disruptions and lessons.
Banker666
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Banker666,
User Rank: Strategist
7/9/2014 | 6:25:14 PM
Re: Sure thang
From USA Today "'Practical' Google exec caught in tangled sex web"  See what did I tell ya!
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