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Are Macs Taking Over the Enterprise?
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cafzali
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cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
7/9/2014 | 10:57:14 PM
Re: Take over?
Forbes and many other publications have covered this in depth. While it is certainly possible from a software standpoint to go Mac in the enterprise, networks are Microsoft based. Unless you're going to go completely cloud based, your network infrastructure (e.g. e-mail server, router, hubs, access points) is all going to be tied together using Microsoft products.

The companies you cite are technology based, which hardly represent the vast majority of American enterprises. And the reason Intel uses a few Macs is to keep a business relationship with Apple, as much as anything.

Look, I get why people like Macs, but they're not going to win over the enterprise. The only reason Apple is alive today to even make a computer resurgence is the success of iTunes and their transformation of the music business model. Were it not for that, the troubled Apple of the late 1990s would have lasted a while longer and likely joined the rest of computer industry has beens that were once high fliers.
truthiness
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truthiness,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 8:50:22 PM
Re: Take over?
=>30% Mac OS X Penetration Rate
  • Cisco
  • Intel
  • McAfee
  • Palo Alto Networks

Why? It was PROVEN they were less expensive over a 3 year period- not to but mind you but the support costs over that period are significantly cheaper. PC only apps? Few and far between and for those that HAVE to have it- VMWare.

 
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
7/9/2014 | 7:10:28 PM
Re: Take over?
@soozyg

The iOS devices definitely helped. iPhones and iPads helped create BYO programs, which opened the floodgates for people to bring all kinds of Mac devices into the office. Once that happens, other dominoes start to fall.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
7/9/2014 | 7:08:27 PM
Re: Take over?
@cafzali,


Macs are definitely more popular (and viable) in certain industries than others. But I swear, any time I go to a Silicon Valley company, I see more Apple machines than PCs. All over the place too, from reception, to engineers, to execs. It would be interesting to get an accurate breakdown of Mac penetration within more industries. I think the Mac user base is big enough for useful aggregate statistics to be generated, but neverthless, comparing the growing Mac enterprise base to the vastly larger Windows enterprise base isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, as you point out.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
7/9/2014 | 7:03:10 PM
Re: Take over?
@mel,


Yes, I think "taking over" is unlikely, but they're certainly becoming more common, as BYOD options if not as also corporate-issued devices. As for the management issue, like I suggested in the article, VMware has to make Macs sound desirably yet also incomplete. Otherwise, they wouldn't have anything to sell, and wouldn't have much interest in releasing a study. These studies, as I am sure you know, always carry a grain of salt, since the commissioning company always has a vested interest in the results. Anecdotally, I hear people say both that Macs are easy to manage, and that they present problems. I think it probably depends what applications you need the Mac to run, and how familiar the IT staff is with non-Windows management. I've seen Mac environments that hum along without trouble, but I've also seen authentication precautions and virtualization implementations that turn MacBook Pros into near-bricks.
cafzali
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cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
7/9/2014 | 4:21:33 PM
Re: Take over?
@Technocrati Yes, they're still using XP. Microsoft offers the option for companies to pay for continuing XP support as they migrate to Windows 7. That's what these enterprises are doing. 
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/9/2014 | 4:03:32 PM
Re: Take over?

@Shane    Ah yes Windows 7.   I agree.     I hope MS continues to build on Windows 7 - I like it and I did not find it to be a difficult transition from XP.   

 

And I would also agree  Windows 7  is just as user friendly as OS X espcially for getting work done.

Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
7/9/2014 | 3:31:39 PM
Re: Take over?
I agree, Windows 8 has been frustrating, no question. I was referring to Windows 7, which in my experience has a better UI for getting work done than OS X.
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/9/2014 | 3:27:14 PM
Re: Take over?

@Shane    That number is surprising, but I would not believe it either until I tried to get used to Windows 8.1

My initial difficulty rate was sky-high.  I don't remember such frustration using a Mac for the first time.

Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/9/2014 | 3:23:43 PM
Re: Take over?

@cafzali     I agree in the traditional enterprise, Mac's are not making the inroads that I suggested in my earlier post. I work in the creative field so as you say, I am adapt to see this more often than most.  I should have provided context to my response.

What I find interesting is that the company you refer to is not even on Windows 7.   They are still running XP ?   I have worked in a traditional environment and I am familiar with OS's being a release behind, but I must say I am surprised to learn this.

As far as Windows 8.1 is concerned.  I agree it is not made for the enterprise, but this OS will start to make it's way inside the enterprise just like the Mac OS did as a result of the other devices it rests on.

I really worry that companies are still using Windows XP given the fact MS will eventually stop supporting it.

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