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Android Data Wipe Leaves Personal Data
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MarylandMike
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MarylandMike,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 2:05:53 PM
Re: Shouldn't be a surprise
My guess is that some of those phones were from 'over achievers'.  There might be a picture or 2 on some phones whereas others might have hundreds...
MarylandMike
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MarylandMike,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 2:04:53 PM
Android naivete
The Andoid OS (for all it's features) reminds me of an old comparison between DOS 5.0 and Windows 95.  There were some things that simply couldn't be done in Win 95.  The Avast product would (I hope) allow you to delete everything except the default OS.  Some users just want a clean machine.  On my Android tablet, I don't see (or recognize) hidden files/system files, read-only files.  We don't know what is under the covers of the OS, but at least we realize that our photos, our forms are there for the saavy user.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/9/2014 | 1:51:30 PM
Re: Shouldn't be a surprise
Maybe I am naive, but that averages out to 50 risque photos per phone. Seems high among the general (non frat boy) population.

Or am I wrong?
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/9/2014 | 1:36:31 PM
Do I see the next big lawsuit a brewin'?
Did those people whose personal information and embarrassing photos are now in the hands of strangers have some kind of legal, enforceable expectation of privacy after they "wiped" their smartphones? The attorneys must be lickin' their chops.
SoStupocrisy
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SoStupocrisy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 1:33:10 PM
Re: Shouldn't be a surprise
Surely you don't think that only "frat boys" have this kind of material on their phones?!?

I've seen adults well above the 40yo mark with such things on many occassions...what bubble are you living under?
Henrisha
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Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/9/2014 | 1:11:08 PM
Re: Shouldn't be a surprise
It does make more sense to store data (sensitive files, private photos, etc) on a removable SD card. Definitely better than having to go through folders in the phone one by one to check (although it's still recommended that you do this, as a just-in-case maesure.)
ChrisW967
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ChrisW967,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 1:03:00 PM
Maths
4 of 20 --> 1 in 5, not 1 in 4.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/9/2014 | 12:50:44 PM
Re: Shouldn't be a surprise
OK, so here's what surprises me: "750 of women in various stages of undress and 250 male nudes -- from just 20 phones."

Who did they buy them from, a bunch of frat boys?!
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
7/9/2014 | 12:42:23 PM
Re: Shouldn't be a surprise
I'm not sure if Avast has done similar research on iOS or Windows devices, but Android (as well as Windows) does have one thing in its favor despite this issue. A micro SD card can be removed when the phone is sold. If all your photos are on the SD card and you keep it, then the guy who buys your used phone can't get access to them.

Regardless, one should still use a true wipe tool that overwrites the data blocks multiple times to make sure all electronic traces are gone.
KeithT494
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KeithT494,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/9/2014 | 12:31:09 PM
Shouldn't be a surprise
This shouldn't be news to a technology professional worth a grain of salt. All non-volatile computer storage, whether it be hard disk or flash memory, work the same way -- deleting the file doesn't make the data disappear, any more than throwing that top secret memo in your trash can makes it disappear. Or taking it home and giving it to your 3-year-old to color on.

Android's factory reset (and the factory reset for almost any device, Android or otherwise) isn't a "wipe." That's a simplistic layperson misconception. The purpose of factory reset is to reset the system software to its original state. It does this mostly by deleting files, and restoring other files from an original image or state.

Factory reset is NOT a security function. If you want a security erase, there are specific tools for that. They use repetetive, slow algorithms to specifically eradicate all remains of the data. Be sure you use one that's flash-memory-aware, though, because the automatic "cycling" of flash memory -- done to preserve it's lifetime -- can render such algorithms mostly useless.

Again, not news to any technology professional worth a grain of salt. I don't know what IW's target audience is, but if there are CTOs, CIOs, MISes, IT directors, and other technology-managing types who didn't already know this fundamental storage hardware fact, our technology infrastructure is in deep doo-doo.
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