Comments
Net Neutrality: Comment Period Closing
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Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
7/15/2014 | 4:35:03 PM
Re: Tom Wheeler, why did you abandon net neutrality?
Mozilla's plan sounds promising.
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
7/15/2014 | 4:26:24 PM
Tom Wheeler, why did you abandon net neutrality?
The abandonment of strict net neutrality by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler makes it harder to maintain a bulwark against all the forces that wish to undermine it. No matter how you phrase it, the proposition that we will create fast lanes -- without slowing other lanes -- is more a figment of the imagination than a reality. If we merely end up with some lanes that have never been slowed alongside those that have been dramatically speeded up, we'd have a se vere two-tier system that would force many Internet users to pay. The public Internet should remaina utility in existence for the good of the general public, not some gatekeepers capable of imposing a two-tier system and collecting for it.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
7/15/2014 | 12:50:19 PM
Re: Net Neutrality
Why is Netflix signing traffic priority deals with Verizon and Comcast, if they don't like the idea of a paid internet?

Verizon needs to charge for internet access, they can either charge the customer as per their usage, or they could average out the cost equally between everyone -- 1TB or 1GB monthly bandwidth utilization, the cost would be the same to the customer. Another possibility is that content providers pay for the internet, for example, Facebook offers free bandwidth on mobile networks in a few countries. Or, the government could treat the internet like a utility and pay for it, by collecting taxes. 
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/15/2014 | 10:19:24 AM
Net Neutrality
Have you weighed in to the FCC, readers? Also, what would you tell Verizon about its position on Net Neutrality?


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