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5 Reasons Going Paperless Won't Work
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Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
7/21/2014 | 10:39:30 AM
Re: paperless
Nicholas A Basbanes wrote in  A Splendor of Letters: The Permanence of Books in an Impermanent World  Harper Collins 2003:

Anyone whose first computer used 5.25-inch floppy disks, anyone who wrote correspondence, reports, or journalism on Wordstar or kept business records on VisiCalc, anyone whose attempt to access a website is greeted by an "Error 404" responses ... has a sense of the crisis being faced on a far more massive scale by librarians, archivists, and curators all over the word. While books printed 300 years ago work the same way as those bound today, data recorded just 20 years ago can be indecipherable on today's equipment,' David M. Wealt wrote in an article for Information Week. 'What use is a perfectly preserved Word File, if a thousand years from now, nobody has a copy of Microsoft Office or a Windows machine to run it on?'" The dilemma was brought into sharper focus by Peter Lyman and Howard Besser, two participants in a 1998 conference sponsored by the Getty Conservations Institute in Los Angeles. "In fact, out digital cultural heritage is disappearing, almost as fast as it is recorded," they wrote in the introduction to the final report. "Atoms, as in ink on paper, tend to persist. Digital records tend to become inaccessible, rendered unreadable by media deterioration, or obsolete by the pace of innovation in information technology. (p. 274)

danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
7/20/2014 | 5:31:09 PM
Re: paperless
Interesting article. I think that there will be something to be said in the future regarding a comeback for paper. 

It's true: Paper doesn't run out of power, and it is not susceptible to hacking. Maybe there is hope for paper after all. But let's at least not forget that it isn't so great for the environment, although neither is the short hardware cycles of devices that often do not get recycled properly. 
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Moderator
7/20/2014 | 8:34:28 AM
Re: Paper Abides
@LUFU and add to your list whenever you are asking anything from bank they always ask you to send a paper with your signature or a fax not an email. For paperless me need to amend lot of ways and functionalities of many firms which is very much difficult in some time soon.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Moderator
7/20/2014 | 8:31:17 AM
Re: paperless
@Gary I think absolute paperless envirnoment is not achieveable in forseeable future. Why? I think the most safest think which relates to any documentation is the hard proof not the soft one. I believe that we can cut down the use of paper till we use only one copy of a document as a safety precaution. but totally going paper less has its own disadvantages.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
7/19/2014 | 10:34:32 PM
Re: Paper Abides
@LUFU your office sounds fairly typical. As for faxes, actually, some do work without actual paper. I didn't have the latest insurance information on my card for my pharmacy, so I asked it to be faxed over. I expected it to come right away but was told it can take a while. I was rather surprised at that. One of the pharmacists explained that they don't receive paper faxes -- only images on the computer. I suppose that accounts, in part, for the delay. 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
7/19/2014 | 10:34:31 PM
Re: Paper Abides
@LUFU your office sounds fairly typical. As for faxes, actually, some do work without actual paper. I didn't have the latest insurance information on my card for my pharmacy, so I asked it to be faxed over. I expected it to come right away but was told it can take a while. I was rather surprised at that. One of the pharmacists explained that they don't receive paper faxes -- only images on the computer. I suppose that accounts, in part, for the delay. 
LUFU
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LUFU,
User Rank: Strategist
7/19/2014 | 3:23:53 PM
Paper Abides
We have one foot in the paper world and one foot in the digital paperless world. In the office/work environment we try to minimize paper usage but it is still inescapable. By my desk I keep a scratchpad to jot down messages, phone numbers, notes, reminders, and doodles while I work. It's just easier. Think paper is going away any time soon? Work with a lawyer or doctor/hospital and they still ask to "fax" something to them. Fax? Doesn't that still need a piece of paper?

Then it comes to the major events. How does one RSVP to a paperless wedding invitation? Doesn't the pending nuptials seem less important if it is an evite? And what about the first birthday card from my wife years ago that I've saved? Is a digital birthday card worth saving?
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Strategist
7/19/2014 | 1:55:04 PM
Re: paperless
I agree with the article.  The trend of going paperless depends on whether it meets the needs of the organization.  The processes that do not work should be replaced.  I think tech enthusiast want to shift everything to electronic form as if it was a panacea to improving all the problems in an organization.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Moderator
7/19/2014 | 8:18:00 AM
I work in electronic document management...
and have implemented and supported a document management system for the last 13 years.  The whole point of our system is to convert customers to paperless.  Our most popular automation is still Autoprint, meaning sending electronic documents to printers for users.  So yeah, I agree with you first hand, we will never be 100% paperless, and I don't think that's a bad thing (unless you happen to be a tree...)
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/18/2014 | 2:39:08 PM
Re: paperless
I agree. The last mile is always the hardest, and sometimes it's just not worth the effort. As digital devices get cheaper and cheaper, and as they are more universally introduced earlier in each individual's life, the goal of going totally paperless may someday be reachable. But, not yet.
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