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Salary Negotiation For Women: Ask The Expert
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ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
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7/18/2014 | 2:55:14 PM
More on this topic
By coincidence, this New Yorker article on the same theme just showed up in my Twitter feed.Looking forward to this radio broadcast and discussion: 

LEAN OUT: THE DANGERS FOR WOMEN WHO NEGOTIATE


http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/mariakonnikova/2014/06/lean-out-the-dangers-for-women-who-negotiate.html?mbid=social_retweet
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/18/2014 | 3:57:34 PM
Tightrope walkers
Feel free to post questions for Professor Williams here. The goal is to share many practical strategies and tips during the show and Q&A. I hope you'll join us.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
7/18/2014 | 5:43:49 PM
Re: Tightrope walkers
This NPR article points to a study that suggests women do better negotiating for others than themselves when it comes to salary. Perhaps we'd all be better served by an advocate in dealings with management. It's said a lawyer representing himself or herself has a fool for a client. It seems reasonable to assume that holds true in negotiations that don't involve attorneys or courtrooms.
TechWriterDaria
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TechWriterDaria,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/18/2014 | 7:09:30 PM
Re: Tightrope walkers
I find that salary is easier to negotiate than things like a flexible schedule, special working arrangements, or time off. Several years ago I was at a company where a male engineer negotiated an arrangement where he worked remotely 3 out of 4 weeks a month. He was divorced and wanted to be near his young daughter who lived out-of-state with his ex-wife. He was accomodated and praised for being such a 'dedicated father'. If a woman asked for a similar arrangement, would people praise her for being a 'dedicated mother' or would she be viewed as 'not committed to her career'?
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/19/2014 | 8:47:48 AM
Re: Tightrope walkers
Daria, thanks for chiming in here. The example you raise is a good one. The mix of men and women on the team can really matter in situations like this, too. Also, are you hanging out there on your own asking for the change in situation, or have others asked? Men may be seen as trailblazers making these requests -- I'm guessing your colleague was -- while women may seem "pushy." It's a classic tightrope situation.
progman2000
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progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
7/19/2014 | 10:53:23 AM
Re: Tightrope walkers
Unfortunately I have seen my fair share of male chauvinists at the C-level which has led to this amongst my female peers.  It's aweful, and I can't help but feel that we're a geneartion behind where that will really cease to be an issue.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
7/21/2014 | 7:26:11 AM
Re: Tightrope walkers
One thing I would be interested to hear more about in the call is whether the approach women take in negotiatiations, and their success with it, varies much by industry.  
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
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7/21/2014 | 1:46:44 PM
Re: Tightrope walkers
Question: I was always told that in any negotiation, the first person to name a figure loses. However, recently I've seen a few experts question that conventional wisdom. What's her take?
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/21/2014 | 2:49:00 PM
Re: Tightrope walkers
Good question Lorna. Many job interview processes begin with a recruiter or HR pro asking you for a range you are seeking. You have to name at least a range first. This is why research is crucial. Let's see if there's more specific advice we can share here.
KimberlyC025
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KimberlyC025,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/22/2014 | 12:58:49 PM
Re: Tightrope walkers
I have been both a tightrope walker and a trailblazer. For me- having flex time is of the utmost importance because I have children and do not care that anyone knows this. I am more circumspect about my age- which seems to be more of an issue than the fact I have progeny. That said- since I have long experience in my field (Nework Security) and I have less patience with b.s. as I get older- I have more candor. That candor for me has been a good thing. I respect the fact sometimes you have to hold your tongue- but overall I speak my mind. I am polite but I am firm and I make myself very clear. Sometimes I get the eyerolls but overall I get where I am trying to get to- even if it takes time. I have a rule of thumb that works for me. I research what the average salary is at an organization and ask for about 10% higher. It is a great starting point- if you do not get the higher salary get the flex time : ) Another thing to do is to be willing to walk away. Seriously. It may be one thing to accept something because you desparately need a job- but the best time to look for a job is when you already have one. I have never stopped looking- and if I interview I am polite, but candid and very firm about what I want. I am willing to negotiate to a point, but if I discern sexism (or in my case ageism) I walk away. Money is a grand place to start- but corporate culture will speak volumes about how far you get in that organization. Cheers!
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 1:11:44 PM
Re: Tightrope walkers
@Kimberly, thanks for sharing your experience. I agree with you on culture -- a great salary in a culture you can't live with is not going to be a win in the long run. In the interviews I have had since becoming a parent, I didn't want it to be a state secret that I was a parent. So I let it be known at the very end of the process. Some experts advise the opposite, but I needed to know the culture fit.
MDMConsult14
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MDMConsult14,
User Rank: Moderator
7/23/2014 | 6:55:29 PM
Re: Tightrope walkers
These type of cases also make sense when women in the workforce find themselves in situations where they may have to negotiate time off due to labor delivery. A lot of firms today have incorporated programs for this and time of to leave for these reasons. Being a strong negotiator will have an advantage to negotiating these aspects to a woman's career.


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