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Why Enterprises Need To Adapt To Agile
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Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/30/2014 | 7:45:46 PM
Re: Demonstration not reviews
@nasimson: Look forward to hearing more about your experiences and how the team responds. Legal reviews can be the death of many a good project. 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/30/2014 | 7:44:27 PM
Re: It all comes down to requirements
@moarsauce123: what you're pinpointing really is a flaw in leadership, not a flaw in process. That is spot on. I've seen so much wheel-spinning happen in my career because of executive indecision. I can see why agile would be attrractive though, the thought being: If we can get a first iteration of this off the ground and show it to the stakeholders then maybe they really will make a decision...
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Ninja
7/27/2014 | 1:54:44 AM
Re: It all comes down to requirements
@moarsauce: > In other words, we no longer have to make decisions and have the dev > teams spend weeks on building something based on a few vague bullet > points and then we tell them what we really want You have hit the nail on its head. I have seen it happening a couple of times. And it still is funny and sad at the same time every time. >
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Ninja
7/27/2014 | 1:43:38 AM
Demonstration not reviews
I love your article, since it touches on some of the pain points we are currently facing. I especially admire the tip about replacing legal reviews with demonstrations. I am going to suggest it right away to the team.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 6:14:02 PM
Too much lip service to agile
It's my strong impression that many organizations are motivated to claim to be using agile methodology, because they've heard that's supposed to be a good thing, but their commitment doesn't go any further than saying the words.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 10:08:35 AM
Re: Why Enterprises Need To Adapt To Agile
Xerox203, to your on-target point about CIOs being too busy hitting today's deadlines to consider an article like this, I think that's why it's all the more important that someone like Eric takes the time to share lessons learned with his IT peers in this community. An article like this gives fuel to the Agile evangelists -- who are often a step or two removed from the CIO chair, initially -- a conversation starter, or a re-starter. I've shared this article directly already this morning with one Agile evangelist who I know is out there trying to drive this kind of cultural change.    
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 7:58:10 AM
Re: Why Enterprises Need To Adapt To Agile
Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us, Eric. You're certainly right - Agile is not going away, and companies that want to pretend it is risk going the way of Music Publishers (vs. digital downloads) and Blockbuster (vs. Netflix) - I think it's that fundamental of a change. On that note, we see an alarming trend when it comes to businesses and traditions, don't we? Saying the we 'fear change' is a bit of an understatement - we have processes, support systems, and cultural idioms in place to justify ourselves avoiding and downplaying change in the business world. We say 'risk-averse' and 'dependable' instead of admitting we fear change. So, you're right again - it's the culture that needs to change.

I always have a secondary concern when reading something like this - while all your points are very good, I'm concerned whether the target audience for something like this (that is, CIOs who are resistant to Agile) are the kind of people who read technology blogs in their free time. It's a big world out there, and there are lots of companies large and small who are still not embracing Agile (or, any new trend) - and those CIOs may be focused on getting today's work down more than worrying about tomorrow. Maybe there's an additional lesson that we can only control our own actions in this big ocean... the best we can do other than that is pass some advice on to the next person.


moarsauce123
IW Pick
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 7:33:35 AM
It all comes down to requirements
First of "the entire organization -- not just the development team -- needs to buy into agile" is the best piece in this article. I'm suffering through agile for about three years now and that is the key point that is missing. We need to roll out new product, but the hosting team takes months to fire up a few servers. We review new tech but cannot use it because a year ago during budget prep we had no idea that we would benefit from something that didn't exist yet.

Also, many who want to do agile jump into scrum and see their projects fail. The reason is that especially scrum adds an excessive amount of overhead with daily meetings and retrospectives and so forth. At the same time no effort is spent on planning and documentation. Yes, agile means less documentation, but not no documentation.

No matter how projects are approached it all comes down to the clarity of requirements. No matter if agile, waterfall, or something else, if there is no clear request for "Build this!" then projects will always take longer than expected if they work out at all. The biggest problem with agile is the idea that "we hit this in the next iteration" or we "can iterate over the same thing a few times". In other words, we no longer have to make decisions and have the dev teams spend weeks on building something based on a few vague bullet points and then we tell them what we really want.

Since all this wobbling and indecision requires so much rework the entire project takes longer so something always has to be cut. That is typically quality because in the qarterly plans functionality was already committed to. Agile is the death to quality and the breeding ground for corporate indecision.
soozyg
IW Pick
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
7/21/2014 | 4:13:50 PM
Re: fluid agility
For each iteration, team members demonstrated their product not just to the full product team, but also to the other stakeholders, such as the legal and security teams.

When this works I would think this strategy would satisfy many departments at once. Plus, it would be cohesiveness to the company because everyone has the same info about the same project at the same time.
soozyg
IW Pick
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soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
7/21/2014 | 4:08:05 PM
fluid agility
external thinking of entrepreneurs and help us develop products...based on a continuous loop of feedback from customers

This sounds awesome! What methods do you use for your "continuous loop" of feedback?
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