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10 More Robots That Could Change Healthcare
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David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 3:06:49 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@vnewman2- Wow, that's fascinating. Without bringing up anything too horrific or traumatizing for you, could you be more specific on how they are different? I'd love ot know what, if anything, robots could do to fill in those gaps.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 3:03:35 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@glenbren- Costs of robots are coming down. Unfortunately, I don't know the cost of the RIBA, but the Jibo is just $400. that seems nearly impossible 10 years ago. I think the key to making them cost effective is to free up highly trained people from mundane tasks. Every time you have a nurse or therapist helping lift a patient to change their lines, that's time they aren't spending on the stuff that robots can't do.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 3:01:24 PM
Re: Robot better than I thought!
@imapctnow- At least you know the robot maggot will leave your brain when it is done. :)

and you are right about the blood draw robot. I think this one is eaisly underestimated. Not only in terms of time savings but pain savings. Teaching a robot to do this right, pain-free, the first time, every time will make a huge difference to quality of care.
vnewman2
IW Pick
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 2:54:53 PM
Re: Kernerworks
Re the EXOSKELETON.  3 words.  Sigourney Weaver.  Aliens.

Way cool.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 2:43:12 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@soozyg - I am with you on this one - by far my favorite.  I worked as a lifeguard for about 10 years as a teenager and college student into my early 20s.  I've taken all types of first aid, CPR, and lifesaving classes, held every related certification and taken every necessary training class.  Let me just tell you - the training situations were NOTHING like what actually happened when someone was really drowning.  Nothing at all.  I'm sure the same is the case for trauma training - the closer you can get to real life simulations the better because preparation is EVERYTHING.
cafzali
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cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
7/22/2014 | 2:06:50 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Dave Telemedicine -- definitely. This is one of those areas where we've sort of missed the boat in terms of quality of care for rural patients and reducing costs. In actuality, there are many small areas that would be better served with a higher quality emergency room and transportation options to better facilities rather than operating an acute care hospital. 

But hospitals are one of those "third rails" of local politics. Nobody wants to lose their local hospital, but the economics of operating one is very difficult. Telemedicine would allow consults with specialists who would not otherwise travel there, you could replace in person folow up visits with them, etc. In reality, there's probably more potential to do real things in this area in medicine than there is in education. 
glenbren
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glenbren,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/22/2014 | 2:04:31 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
 I think there is a place for robots and telemdeicine in more rural areas. For isntance, the RIBA seems more likely to be useful in place where the population is small and there are fewer people in the workforce to help with care.

Not sure rural area hospitals could afford such robots. My favorites were the maggot types. Pretty icky, but better, if it worked, than any alternative we have now.
impactnow
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impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 1:54:21 PM
Robot better than I thought!

Dave I liked these robots more than I thought--the maggot robot I could have done without. Brain cancer or maggot in your head it could be a decision for some. I especially liked the robot that soothed patients so many in the medical area are time stresses and don't have time to provide patients with these soft variables that really make a medical experience positive or negative. I also liked the vein robot since I always have a bruised arm after a blood draw because a vein can't be found!

Henrisha
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Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 1:40:50 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
Aside from hospitals, I see the robot being useful in training centers and schools, too. It's where healthcare workers-to-be receive primary training, after all. I am hoping partnerships between larger and small hospitals will form in order to make this technology more accsesible.
Henrisha
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Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 1:39:38 PM
Re: Kernerworks
I'm with you, the Kernerworks would definitely make an impact in healthcare. The training it facilitates is invaluable, considering that it bsaically teaches people to save lives.
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