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3 Reasons We Don't Need Federal CIOs
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Andre Leonard
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Andre Leonard,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/28/2014 | 2:42:16 PM
Re: Spot on article
Linda, I sense a smart, honest and intelligent woman. Please don't waste your innovation, time or talent working for government. There is a reason they are always a day late, a dollar short and always over budget. 

Andre,
LindaC873
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LindaC873,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 2:29:10 PM
Re: Spot on article
You are so right, @Andre.  

As a CIO at NASA, I visited the ground station for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite Systems.  This critical national infrastructure is essential for space communications -- yet, the heroes and she-roes supporting the critical capability is forced to keep it available and operational with a maintenance budget that is paultry.  

They often resort to soldering guns, duct tape, and e-Bay to provide the means to maintain this national treasure.  Every year, during the budget cycle, I ask ... why is this ok?  

I never got an answer.  But perhaps the answer is -- it's ok because it's government.
LindaC873
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LindaC873,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 2:17:43 PM
Re: Is the federal CIO job really this bad?
@David, if it was an exaggerations, why are we talking about FITARA?  Why wasn't Clinger-Cohen enough? What's broken and are we fixing it?
LindaC873
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LindaC873,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 2:11:45 PM
Re: What's the proper role of OMB?
I'm a big fan of the Open Data initiative.  I believe that it will be the source of some great innovations relative to what we can do with unfettered data.  OMB and OSTP should be commended for the positive outcomes that we see from this initiatives.  

I think the current debacle of Federal IT is not solely the fault of any one branch of the government.  I believe that the "blame" is to be shared by OMB, the legislative branch, agencies, and some CIOs themselves.  

If I could use an analogy here --

OMB wants CIOs to paint masterpieces.  Yet, they provide guidance that is akin to "paint by numbers". Sure, you'll have a painting that represents "something" but it significantly misses the mark of greatness.  Inspector Generals want to make sure the CIO Artist stays in the lines; Congress wants to restrict how much paint can be used; and agencies what CIOs to guess what picture needs to be painted.  

In the end, all you get is a bunch of paint on a canvass and a mess of Federal IT.  
mshimamoto968
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mshimamoto968,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/24/2014 | 2:49:34 PM
Re: Thank you Linda.
Linda, thank you for your commentary.  I agree with some of your comments and not with others.  First I'd like to say that the title CIO is a misnomer in my opinion.  Generally the people with the CIO title are IT architects, chief technologists, or mission support managers.  Very few are actually responsible for the development and management, other than data bases and web portals, of information.  When I was the PACOM J2 Intelligence IT architecture chief, I never considered myself as a CIO, although I did have the good fortune to be invited to the Federal CIO Summit for the last 2 years before I retired from Federal Civil Service.  The IT architecture is simply an enabler for the organization's mission, and in the case of Intelligence, it should enable what I consider to be the "vision" of Intelligence, i.e., to provide a "God's eye view and understanding" of what are and will be threats to our nation and people around the world.  So I think the 2 Gartner statements are just gobbledygook.  What the heck does "disruptive forces" mean?  Is that the negative of enabling technologies?  Should we still be using messengers on horseback to deliver hand-written correspondence?  Totally agree on your comments on compliance, enough said.  IT is not considered a strategic asset when the seniors don't see how it is a key enabler for their mission/business.  As I sat in the morning intelligence brief and staff meeting, my focus was on how IT could better enable the analysts and staff to both gain and produce better knowledge – that was key to being able to better execute the mission.  This approach resulted in both have a key voice on the staff and being tasked to support key strategic planning efforts.  "CIOs" being treated like children sitting at the "adult" table are probably just "talking IT" vice providing relevant approaches towards achieving the Director's vision, goals, and objectives.
mshimamoto968
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mshimamoto968,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/24/2014 | 2:49:23 PM
Re: Thank you Linda.
Linda, thank you for your commentary.  I agree with some of your comments and not with others.  First I'd like to say that the title CIO is a misnomer in my opinion.  Generally the people with the CIO title are IT architects, chief technologists, or mission support managers.  Very few are actually responsible for the development and management, other than data bases and web portals, of information.  When I was the PACOM J2 Intelligence IT architecture chief, I never considered myself as a CIO, although I did have the good fortune to be invited to the Federal CIO Summit for the last 2 years before I retired from Federal Civil Service.  The IT architecture is simply an enabler for the organization's mission, and in the case of Intelligence, it should enable what I consider to be the "vision" of Intelligence, i.e., to provide a "God's eye view and understanding" of what are and will be threats to our nation and people around the world.  So I think the 2 Gartner statements are just gobbledygook.  What the heck does "disruptive forces" mean?  Is that the negative of enabling technologies?  Should we still be using messengers on horseback to deliver hand-written correspondence?  Totally agree on your comments on compliance, enough said.  IT is not considered a strategic asset when the seniors don't see how it is a key enabler for their mission/business.  As I sat in the morning intelligence brief and staff meeting, my focus was on how IT could better enable the analysts and staff to both gain and produce better knowledge – that was key to being able to better execute the mission.  This approach resulted in both have a key voice on the staff and being tasked to support key strategic planning efforts.  "CIOs" being treated like children sitting at the "adult" table are probably just "talking IT" vice providing relevant approaches towards achieving the Director's vision, goals, and objectives.
Mike Nesel
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Mike Nesel,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/24/2014 | 12:16:05 PM
Thank you Linda.
Thanks for your insights Linda!   We enjoyed your visits, and wish you well in your endeavors!

 
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/23/2014 | 4:32:28 PM
Re: Corporate vs Mission and Control (or lack of it)
@Kimberly thanks for weighing in as a vet of GovIT. The situation worries me in terms of recruiting that next gen of GovIT talent -- and we really need those cybersecurity folks.
Andre Leonard
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Andre Leonard,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/23/2014 | 1:22:47 PM
Spot on article
Linda Cureton, is to be commended for writing a very eloquent piece that exposes the shortcomings and lack of focus we see in government today. 

What we do know about government is, it follows, never leads. As such, it is always at least 20 years behind the times in everything. The term, a day late, a dolar short and in last place, could have very well been written for government.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
7/23/2014 | 10:29:35 AM
Is the federal CIO job really this bad?
Is this an exaggeration, or is the mix of responsibilities and authority really this far out of whack?
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