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The IPv6 Skills Crisis
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D.M. Romano
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D.M. Romano,
User Rank: Moderator
7/31/2014 | 8:11:41 AM
Priority?
Appreciate you sending along the links to some good IPv6 sites. I do find it interesting how there's so much talk about needing to migrate to IPv6 for obvious reasons, but many enterprises just aren't ready to make the move. And not just them, but some of the products you buy nowadays are prioritizing the technology due to low demand. 
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 9:35:36 AM
Re: The IPv6 Skills Crisis
Thanks for sharing this, Edward. The mixed response here in the comments already says a lot, I think, about IPv6 and what it means to IT people. It's an important piece of the modern puzzle, and from a "news" perspective it may already be a fixture - it may be old news, but that doesn't mean that that's the case for every professional or every organization. It might be the case where, as with many other technologies, people might be using 'just enough' of a new technology to get their jobs done, and might be a little of the loop. Who can blame them? The thing is, though, that what's needed for 'just enough' might be increasing out of their knowledge base.

To that end, I appreciate the idea of a concerted effort to pring professionals around the country up to speed. I had no idea that something like a national IPv6 board existed, but it's a good thing that it does. Kudos to you guys for all the hard work! It looks like you, personally, have put in a lot of mileage with the talks and the conferences - that's a lot of dedication to one topic! Maybe I'll see you at Interop New York. In the meantime, this is a great list of resources. I'm especially happy at the inclusion of such a comprehensive-looking Wiki.
zaious
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zaious,
User Rank: Moderator
7/24/2014 | 12:33:34 AM
Re: Lack of planning on steroids
"It will happen, I knew it, but I did not knew that it would happen so fast" -we want to avoid it, but it just keep happening. Everything either catches us either over prepared or off-guard. IT would is so dynamic!
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 6:30:04 PM
Tech needs to be more inclusive
A most excellent write up with a great list of resources - I would like to see more online education opportunities for IPv6 along the lines of Dash as opposed to stratospherically priced bootcamps, which is a big reason for most alleged skills shortages, along with a bigger, much more pronounced denouncing of the ever pervasive ageism/sexism that seems to define the greater portion of IT work in the US.  I strongly suspect that if IT was not regarded as the exclusive, elite domain of male employees under age 25, perhaps there wouldn't be such a shortage of skilled workers.   
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/23/2014 | 1:50:32 PM
Re: Lack of planning on steroids
This seems like one of those "it probably won't be an issue, but ..." situations. Maybe you're right for your company, but what if you're not? Thread is IPv6. Translation seems iffy with security protocols, including IPSec. Also, Vint Cerf said so on Colbert!!  Of course, I also always keep bottled water, batteries, and canned goods on hand. 
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 1:18:08 PM
Re: Lack of planning on steroids
This is a tough one, Lorna, for those of us who support manufacturing businesses. IPV4 depletion is not an issue, we use a private 10.29.x.x network. I suppose there are some technical aspects of NAT which are theoretically flawed but it has been working fine for us for years, with nothing on horizon which will change that.

This is one of those projects which all the work/cost brings absolutely nothing to the business we could not do before. Very similar to Y2K, except there you could identify issue which would disrupt applications, forcing you to deal with it.

Here, I am not so sure. If our proxy server which implements NAT can translate IPV6 outside firewall to our internal IPV4, I'm not sure there will ever be much motivation to switch. Proxies should easily be able to do that, if they already aren't.

Will be interesting to see how this plays out. May be that IPV4 never really goes away for people like us, just like HTML5 does not prevent you from writing/running the old HTML versions if you want.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/23/2014 | 10:55:18 AM
Lack of planning on steroids
It's not like the tech community didn't see this problem coming -- it's been years of warnings of v4 address depletion and the inadvisability of depending on NAT. And yet, here we are. I've even seen debate about whether gateways can handle IoT traffic without forcing us to deal with those pesky long v6 addresses. Good thing for IT, I guess, that LOB leaders are largely not aware of the problem ... yet. 


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