Comments
Amazon Fire Phone Early Reviews Tepid
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stotheco
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stotheco,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 1:46:29 AM
Re: There's a sucker born every minute
Amazon tried to do too much with the Fire phone. Some of the features are futuristic but they sound half-baked to me, even more so in application when the reviewers found them hard to use or hard to make sense of.
stotheco
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stotheco,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 1:45:31 AM
Re: There's a sucker born every minute
It's laudable that Amazon is taking risks, but the problem I have with what they're doing is that they don't seem to be well-thought out at all.
stotheco
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stotheco,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 1:44:21 AM
Re: Amazon isn't competing for the high-end
This makes me wonder if Amazon ever did any consumer testing with the phone while it was still in the works. The features sound interesting, I won't lie. But are they useful? Are they practical? I would say no, and they aren't what average mobile phone users would look for in a phone.
melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 8:13:22 AM
Re: Amazon isn't competing for the high-end
But some of the features don't even make any sense, technically, or in user friendliness. The concept of a 3D UI, is already known to not work well. Apple tried with a minor 3D effect in iOS 7, and people said it made them ill, so they had to turn the minor effect down. Nintendo has a failure in 3D with their 3DS. People don't like 3D movies, and some are made ill from that as well. It seems as though Amazon has made a bad bet on this in the chase to have a unique feature. But I don't understand the feature. Apple has shown you can have a 3D effect that moves with movement of the device, without sensors to track your head. There's an app in the store, called Holotoy, that does even more (for free). With the head sensors, the Fire should be able to carry out its functions without needing to move the phone at all. If it really head tracks, that's all it should need. As you move your head, scrolling should start. Move your head again, and it stops, etc. but you need to tilt the phone. That action, which has been done before, elsewhere, uses sensors inside the phone to detect tilt, as iOS 7, and Holotoy does. So what is the head tracking adding to this? Nothing, as far as I can tell.
zaious
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zaious,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:59:49 PM
Re: There's a sucker born every minute
Is it priced for a fight? Not likely. I am not sure what Amazon wanted, a rushing sale at a bargain price or a slow and steady growth. Right now we have known about the relaibility/ performance/ service etc for all other brands/platforms. I will not ask, is tha iPhone fast? Is that Lumia reliable? Does that Android have this feature? These questions will be asked for the Fire phone. I guess it should be a tad cheaper. Free prime membership is the icing on the cake, but still a $100 price tag would make more sense (and sell).
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
7/23/2014 | 7:16:54 PM
A hobbled attempt at cool tech
Disagree, Tom. From its pricing and attempted high tech features, Amazon is competing for the high end or else it's got its approach to the market all wrong. Why charge $199 and attempt to implement 3D user interface if you're trying to put a least common denominator device, good mainly for purchasing, in consumer hands?
MDMConsult14
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MDMConsult14,
User Rank: Moderator
7/23/2014 | 6:58:38 PM
Re: There's a sucker born every minute
It does appear risky to take on the other mobile giants and overpriced.  The advantage I see is with leveraging amazon.com's platform for consumers. Amazon has been really pushing consumer technology with its tablets and devices for today.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 6:44:04 PM
There's a sucker born every minute
A giant, vastly overpriced "buy" button was exacly my perception of the Fire Phone out the gate.  The only consumers who will spend their money on the gimmick in question are those with more disposable income than brain matter.  I see no other compelling reason to spend that kind of jack on such a limited, buggy item.  Nevertheless, society continues to demonstrate P.T. Barnum's best known axiom.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
7/23/2014 | 2:29:39 PM
Amazon isn't competing for the high-end
Amazon doesn't appear to be aiming for the tech savvy crowd. The phone's most innovative feature, the Mayday button, will appeal to the technically averse. Amazon wants phone buyers who'll push buttons to buy stuff, lots of stuff, without really caring about the technology.


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