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Where The IT Jobs Aren't: Tech
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zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2014 | 8:58:25 AM
Re: Where the IT Jobs Aren't
Wow, this article was an eye-opener in itself, but I really feel like I have to thank @TerryB for the exhaustive (but not exhausting) overview of the role of social and collaborative tools in a manufacturing environment - and in an enterprise in general! Like he said, taking that from someone who's been in IT since the 80s really puts it into perspective and helps me get a solid grasp on what we're talking about when we say 'changing skillsets'. There are broad cateogies, and then there specific categories -  those distinctions do matter, but what counts the most is learning as you go.

As for the shift in IT jobs, well... there's a lot to say about that, too. I'm not surprised to see my home state of Massachusetts represented on the map, but I might have thought it would have been in the maximum density set. I suppose that's because the graph was by number of jobs, not percentage of jobs or what-have-you. Anyway, I too am surprised at the stark rise in manufacturing jobs - not necessarily the fact that there's a rise, but at the size of it. That's a pretty big leap. No doubt that's do to an increase in other technologies (IoT-type stuff, more smart devices on the floor like TerryB mentions) as well as customer-facing technologies.
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2014 | 6:10:13 AM
Other sectors
Most of the other sectors are concentrated around power states (with oil, gas, food) and with the recent shift of IT sector jobs (15000 people lost their jobs from the Nokia merger), most of the people will find refuge within the IT sectors of the companies running the power, and hence the sudden growth of other areas except of the Silicon Valley.
RobBellenfant
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RobBellenfant,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2014 | 12:15:39 AM
Continued Education
IT is always changing, so it's natural for the roles and functions within it to be constantly evolving, too. New technology is making it possible for more industries and companies to explore new methods, which will require new-age IT talent to lead the way. Even for those in traditional IT roles, it is imperative to have continuous education and training to stay current and relevant in the industry. These new "creative" IT roles will just offer new areas that IT pros must add to their training. The real pressure will be on universities and training centers to adapt and evolve their programs to help prepre both current IT pros and the next wave of the workforce for these emerging IT roles.
D.M. Romano
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D.M. Romano,
User Rank: Moderator
7/30/2014 | 3:46:02 PM
Differentiation
"In order to compete for jobs, people will have to go much farther to differentiate themselves,"

 

I tend to think a shift in a more blended skillset is proving more valuable nowadays as well. While there is a need to have an "expert" in a given area, that only goes so far with what is being asked of IT professionals nowadays as company's strive to cut expenses and drive up the workload. 
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 2:24:53 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
That makes sense, Chris. I really wasn't thinking about Agile or methodologies, I was talking about "cutting edge"' technology itself. Agile is about how people work, not technology.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
7/30/2014 | 1:58:13 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
I can tell you companies like GE definitely see the opportunity of learning from Silicon Valley, TerryB -- and they're actively trying to blend the cultures of the Valley's speed and agile development with the rigor and controls needed in industrial environments. Below is a video clip of GE CIO Jim Fowler discussing this idea at the InformationWeek Conference this spring -- on how GE opened a Silicon Valley office in part to change the culture of the broader GE:

http://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/executive-insights-and-innovation/ge-power-and-water-cio-discusses-it-speed-and-agility/v/d-id/1279055
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 1:48:47 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
That would make a great story, Chris. I'd love to hear what Silicon Valley thinks is "cutting edge" these days that really applies to companies that manufacture real things like we do.

Facebook, InstaGram, SnapChat, cloud scaling, big data, Hadoop, etc, etc, etc are not relevant to us. If the new kids on the IT block in Silicon Valley think that is where the action is, more power to them. We'll see if they can stretch their careers from 1985 to now, from mainframes to Sencha Ext JS web 2.0 apps like my generation has.

Those young whipper snappers need to show some respect for their elders, we aren't cavemen. :-) I think the old adage "I've forgotten more than you ever knew" may be very relevant for them.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/29/2014 | 3:34:18 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
The other factor is the continued consolidation of the tech companies via mergers and acquisitions. Cloud-related companies are merging on a daily basis it seems. One company=fewer IT jobs. The manufacturing cos may have gone through their consolidations much earlier.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
7/29/2014 | 1:47:17 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
I was telling a friend this weekend, who works at a tech vendor in Silicon Valley, about this survey, and I sensed she was skeptical. Many people can't picture these kind of jobs -- tech in a manufacturing environment -- as cutting edge. I think people who can bridge the two worlds -- the cutting-edge, software-centric mindset of Silicon Valley, with the practical, close-to-the-customer product understanding -- are the winners. 
felixlgriffin
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felixlgriffin,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 12:49:01 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
I found it very refreshing to see a post regarding the state of the IT Industry. I have felt IT is the most important field or industry because of the relevance, (past present and future), of Information Technology. There isn't one industry that doesn't use IT and every industry needs IT. With IT as a foundation, you can make yourself more attractive to employers with the right arsenal of skills. (i.e. Finance, Marketing, Business). I'm a Computer/IT Pro (Network Admin) with Programming and Web Development as well as Marketing and business background. IT isn't going anywhere but business and industry is.. more and more high tech [digital]. It would be in the best interest of anyone, in any field, to put great emphasis on improving their IT skill set. Thanks for sharing Kristin Burnham! Great Post!
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