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Where The IT Jobs Aren't: Tech
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Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 11:50:08 AM
Re: New IT roles
The problem with email becomes evident when you talk to marketing folks.  Constantly sending large files (PowerPoint, PDFs, graphic files) is not a sustainable model.  I can think of many times where I've had to go through my email and delete tons of files just to be able to send a single email with no attachment.  It's simply not a sustainable model, which is why having alternate tools, such as SharePoint are key for many organizations.
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 10:47:52 PM
Re: New IT roles
Sharepoint is the "new way to work together," says Microsoft. Sounds like it's the new way to complicate things. What's wrong with email?
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 11:53:37 AM
Re: New IT roles
That is EXACTLY what is, @jane. This is a people job, about persuasion, not a tech job. That is my biggest surprise that they list this as a IT job.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/25/2014 | 11:52:30 AM
Re: New IT roles
"Not being a Sharepoint "specialist" gave me a perspective that someone who lives solely in that world would never have. When you are a hammer, everything looks like a nail." Bingo. Also incredibly valuable.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 11:46:01 AM
Re: New IT roles
@Laurianne, I'm not sure a specialist would have helped. The technical side of Sharepoint was the easy part, you can Google just about anything you want to know.

The trick here was the integration with the rest of the systems and business isself, figuring out what Sharepoint should be doing and what it should not be doing. And these are not hard fast rules. For example, you can (with Visual Studio/ASP.NET) write entire applications in Sharepoint. But that doesn't mean you should, that it is the best tool for that app. Another decision point was what Sharepoint to use, the free WSS stuff or fork out the dough to buy Enterprise licenses to use all the fancy stuff like KPI web parts and Excel services.

Not being a Sharepoint "specialist" gave me a perspective that someone who lives solely in that world would never have. When you are a hammer, everything looks like a nail. I was able to determine early on that other technologies like Sencha Ext JS are much more robust and maintainable (code wise) to write web apps integrated with line of business data on IBM servers than creating a custom web part app with ASP.NET. You then hang the LINK to Ext JS app in Sharepoint, as far as users know it is Sharepoint. Approaches like that keep Sharepoint vanilla, making upgrades a much easier thing.

The sad thing is, I don't think "collaboration evangelist" has anything to do with that stuff. That sounds like it is strictly about the PR of getting users to adopt to this new paradigm, get away from email. That's why only a huge company could afford to carry a position like that.
Jeff Jerome
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Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 11:44:16 AM
Re: New IT roles
 You gotta love all the buzz words and I have to agree with you it does sound like a cheerleader.  But that is what it takes to create change in an enterprise.  

One other observation I have regarding the post is the number of job postings based on geography. The dark blue with larger populations is a no brainer but some of the others that are light blue are interesting and show a possibility of growth plus a lower cost of living.  If you look at California, lots of jobs which is great but the cost of living is crazy.  I have a meeting this morning with a client that is expanding from North Carolina to the Silicon Valley. The manager is moving here and she told me that her rent doubled to get half the space and add 3 roommates.  Typical rent in SF for a two bedroom apartment can run from 3 - 4,000.00 or more a month.  Tough to survive and might explain why so many companies in the valley offer free food at work, the employees can't afford to eat.  "Will work for Food" Kind of a new example of an old sign.   
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 11:31:57 AM
Re: New IT roles
>> 'collaborator evangelist'?
 sounds like a cheerleader
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/25/2014 | 11:25:22 AM
Re: New IT roles
@TerryB, your experience shows your company was able to use you -- learning as you went along -- to oversee Sharepoint efforts, rather than hire a new specialist. Makes sense for employer and employee. You get fresh skills, they get a person who is a known quantity.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 10:51:41 AM
Re: Interesting titles
@terryB.  I can see where you are going with this.  This is an unnecessary specialization.  Such skills you can learn on the job, there is no need to fragment education even more than what it is now.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 10:03:13 AM
Re: Interesting titles
@MDM, not so sure I agree with you on that. If you were a specialist in Novell, you aren't doing that anymore. In programming, pick your poison. You want to do RPG, COBOL, PERL, PHP, Java, Javascript, C#, VB....Well, you get idea.  More important than language is methodology. Many, many programmers from my generation just could not switch from green screen to OOP, GUI and web technologies.

The key is to understand the core of computer science itself. You can then have a fighting chance to pick up new paradigms and technolgies as they emerge. "Specialization" implies just the opposite.

Even these jobs which are not technical, like user interface specialist. When small smartphone screens came out, did their previous work on web page design help? Same with Touch interfaces. You are not a specialist anymore, you are just learning like the rest of us. How well you can adapt is the key and having a wide base to build from gives you best chance to do so.

I remember in college we had class we wrote a compiler for ADA language in PASCAL, course called Comparitive Languages. Not because they ever expected us to do it in the field but so we would understand what ANY compiler does and what every language has to be able to do.
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