Comments
Just Let Me Code!
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Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
7/24/2014 | 4:48:32 PM
I sympathize
The depth of knowledge needed to create useful apps these days only seems to keep increasing. That's one of the things that has kept me from exploring Web development -- between front-end, back-end, frameworks, and browser dev tools, there's just too much to learn and it's changing too fast to keep up. If I were a professional programmer, that might be less of a problem -- it would be my living. But as a hobbyist, it's too much.

One of the reasons I've stuck with Lua-based Corona SDK for cross-platform mobile development is that ease of use is more important for an amateur than breadth of functionality. Maybe I'll check out Swift at some point but the simplicity of Lua is worth a lot to me. The limitations of a cross-platform framework are sometimes more conducive to project completion than the full range of possibilities that accompany native development.
Andrew Binstock
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Andrew Binstock,
User Rank: Author
7/24/2014 | 5:04:23 PM
Re: I sympathize
Tom: Quite agreed. In mobile, especially, the use of packages that can create good cross-platform apps is a huge time and aggravation saver. In this regard, HTML5 is a valid solution. If we could get the testing and deploy parts simplified, we'd be in good shape.
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
7/24/2014 | 5:54:43 PM
The ambitions have gotten bigger and so have the tools
Although it's an appealing notion, I suspect it was never as simple as 1,2,3 to get a coding project underway, except ones for extremely simple goals. Today you can instantly spin up a virtual machine to develop in and multiple virtual machines in which to stage and test code, no need for the old process of scrounging unused servers around the company. I think the coding ambitions have gotten bigger, and the tools, likewise. The things that got easier have once again been overwhlemed by the expanding goals of the projects.          
Andrew Binstock
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Andrew Binstock,
User Rank: Author
7/24/2014 | 7:49:34 PM
Re: The ambitions have gotten bigger and so have the tools
Perfectly stated, Charlie. 
stotheco
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stotheco,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 1:36:32 AM
Re: I sympathize
Coding was never simple, and things will probably continue to get more complex with time, considering what people expect to be able to do with their apps these days.
stotheco
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stotheco,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 1:38:24 AM
Re: The ambitions have gotten bigger and so have the tools
You've summed it all up very nicely, Charlie. Specially with this bit: " I think the coding ambitions have gotten bigger, and the tools, likewise." The tools evolve as our needs evolve, but sometimes they don't quite catch up with the other.


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