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When Patients Fear EHR
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DarrellP725
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DarrellP725,
User Rank: Moderator
8/7/2014 | 9:30:26 AM
Re: Better?

 


"U.S. Homeland Security contractor reports computer breach"

http://news.msn.com/science-technology/us-homeland-security-contractor-reports-computer-breach

"A company that performs background checks for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security said on Wednesday it was the victim of a cyber attack, adding in a statement that 'it has all the markings of a state-sponsored attack.'"

 

DarrellP725
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DarrellP725,
User Rank: Moderator
8/3/2014 | 1:19:58 PM
Re: Better?
"Complaints about electronic medical records increase," by Bill Toland for Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, August 3, 2014

http://www.post-gazette.com/business/2014/08/03/Complaints-about-electronic-medical-records-increase/stories/201407250006#ixzz39LmZEvLE
DarrellP725
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DarrellP725,
User Rank: Moderator
7/31/2014 | 2:40:03 PM
Re: Better?
"Provider Use of EHRs Could Deter Patient Disclosure, Study Finds," iHealthBeat, July 31, 2014.

http://www.ihealthbeat.org/articles/2014/7/31/study-provider-use-of-ehrs-could-deter-patient-disclosure

"Some patients withhold information from their health care provider out of privacy and security concerns related to the use of electronic health records, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, FierceEMR reports (Durben Hirsch, FierceEMR, 7/28)".
DarrellP725
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DarrellP725,
User Rank: Moderator
7/31/2014 | 12:07:54 PM
Re: Better?
Simply saying something is inevitable, doesn't make it so, even with a mandate. Until HIT stakeholders take ownership of the devastating problems with EHRs - by first acknowledging that paper records are increasingly superior - there will never be an urgency to resolve the problems, and EHRs will never reach their potential.

We have all witnessed that just because a now discredited 2005 RAND study promised savings of $77 billion and 100,000 lives a year by adopting EHRs doesn't make it so. And just because President George W. Bush promised that virtually all healthcare providers would have interoperable EHRs by 2014, also doesn't make it so.

In case anyone missed it, a couple of days ago, in addition to the FBI's April 6 warning that EHRs are becoming increasingly more susceptible to hackers, I mentioned that David Blumenthal M.D., the former national coordinator for health information technology says "... from the provider's perspective, there are substantial costs in setting up and using the [EHR] systems. Until now, providers haven't recovered those costs, either in payment or in increased satisfaction, or in any other way." (See: "Why Doctors Still Use Pen and Paper -The healthcare reformer David Blumenthal explains why the medical system can't move into the digital age," by James Fallows, for The Atlantic, March 19, 2014).

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/04/the-paper-cure/358639/

A few days ago, I read an InformationWeek article by Alison Diana announcing that the Senate Appropriations Committee is seeking an investigation into whether "taxpayer-supported software is preventing the free exchange of patient records between non-partnering healthcare organizations" (See: "Senate Committee Seeks EHR Interoperability Investigation - Bipartisan Senate Appropriations Committee wants an investigation into poor interoperability, possible 'information blocking' in electronic health records").

http://www.informationweek.com/healthcare/electronic-health-records/senate-committee-seeks-ehr-interoperability-investigation/d/d-id/1297580

Because of strategic misinformation, lack of transparency and wishful thinking in the HIT industry, interoperable EHRs are sounding less and less like a sure thing by 2014, 2016 or even 2020.

Interoperability is the key to EHR success. You'll never get there by attempting to discount the value of paper records. People will simply stop believing you.
DarrellP725
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DarrellP725,
User Rank: Moderator
7/31/2014 | 11:11:33 AM
Re: Better?
D. M. Romano: In spite of the fact that EHRs are more expensive, less secure and more dangerous than paper records? That would be foolish.
D.M. Romano
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D.M. Romano,
User Rank: Moderator
7/31/2014 | 10:56:50 AM
Re: Better?
@Darrell - indeed I have. And while I understand the reluctency of some who prefer "paper transactions," the world we live in nowadays just won't support this strategy for much longer. 
DarrellP725
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DarrellP725,
User Rank: Moderator
7/31/2014 | 10:54:28 AM
Re: Better?
D. M. Romano, you have never experienced identity theft, have you.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2014 | 9:28:23 AM
Re: How will they know?
@tzubair,

I can understand and appreciate that. At the same time, it does take a lot of education to quell those fears. The problem is that the education is not free & takes a lot of time and hard work.
D.M. Romano
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D.M. Romano,
User Rank: Moderator
7/31/2014 | 8:20:31 AM
Better?
To be honest, I'm baffled at the fact that people think paper records are in some way better. Notice I said better. Are your records safer in a physical state rather than being online? Maybe. Is there more of a chance for an attacker can sabotage, utilize, or even manipulate your records in this fashion? Sure. But personally I'd rather allow the risk of my information being compromised for the sake of expediency (if that were the issue). And I'm saying this while working as a security analyst where I review vulnerability on a daily basis. 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/30/2014 | 9:58:04 PM
Re: Defending the value of EHR versus paper
@DarrellP725: I didn't realize I was arguing. Then again, I'm Italian, and in my family a normal dinner conversation would sound to other ears like a raging argument.

:)

 
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