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When Patients Fear EHR
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DarrellP725
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DarrellP725,
User Rank: Moderator
7/30/2014 | 9:43:00 PM
Re: Defending the value of EHR versus paper
Susan, your argument isn't with me. It's with CBS.
mhasib
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mhasib,
User Rank: Author
7/30/2014 | 8:42:21 PM
Re: Disaster Recovery?
@Susan - luckily disaster/emergency operations in healthcare is a very mature field and there are many great experts (who are not my students) in this field.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/30/2014 | 8:21:04 PM
Re: Defending the value of EHR versus paper
@DarrellP725: This is quite true. Although it can happen both electronically and on paper. A good friend of mine had his identity stolen at a doctor's office in Florida where he was required to write his social security number on a new-patient form. Turned out one of the employees at the doctor's office was selling patient identity--and no electronic records were involved. It took my friend over 5 years and cost him thousands of dollars to clear his name. The use of Social Security Numbers as identifiers in medical facilities should be eliminated altogether, whether records are on paper or electronic.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/30/2014 | 8:18:24 PM
Re: Disaster Recovery?
@mhasib: Thanks for your response, much appreciated. I hope that if I'm ever in a healthcare facility during a disaster, that its recovery and continuity plans will have been developed by one of your former students!
DarrellP725
IW Pick
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DarrellP725,
User Rank: Moderator
7/30/2014 | 8:13:05 PM
Re: Defending the value of EHR versus paper
"Medical identity theft can threaten health as well as bank account," by Julia Dahl for CBS News, July 28, 2014.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/medical-identity-theft-can-threaten-health-as-well-as-bank-account/
mhasib
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mhasib,
User Rank: Author
7/30/2014 | 7:37:35 PM
Re: Disaster Recovery?
@Susan - I teach an entire semester long graduate course on disaster recover and business continuity so I will not be doing justice to your question here. Most often, when EHR is unavailable other healthcare equipment will also cease to function. This has to be planned for. Basically every organization must create plans and conduct exercises using various scenarios. A more common scenario is a lengthy power loss. Most health organizations have emergency operations departments who are real experts at this and can work with IT and other teams to plan scenarios and training and then lead the execution during an actual crisis. It was really fascinating for me to to see what a great job various departments from the City of Baltimore did during major storm power outages. Good strategists always maintain EHRs in multiple geographically distant locations. For most organizations EHR is only 1 of many IT as well as non IT systems and risks for every system has to be planned for.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/30/2014 | 6:55:37 PM
Disaster Recovery?
@mhasib: I find it fascinating in your field conversations with people that they did not realize their records would ultimately be rendered in electronic form anyway, as well as run thru a copier where the information could be stored and easily retrieved in the copier's hard drive.

I'm joining this robust discussion late, so you may have already talked about this. My biggest concern about elecronic health records is in the instances of natural disater or other mass disruption, as with Hurricane Sandy in NYC. what do you advise recgarding patient records -- espeically for hospital or ciritcal care facilities -- in terms  of disaster recovery if there is no power available, as was the case for some facilities where generators were underwater and mobile phone service was knocked out.

 
mhasib
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mhasib,
User Rank: Author
7/30/2014 | 9:06:53 AM
Re: Selling the change
@tzubair - Thanks. Personally I try not to "sell" people on anything. Rather I try to explain their choices and the consequences in a balanced way. People feel empowered once they are educated. I also explain their rights to them and the fact that the custodians of their data have a legal obligation to protect the privacy of their information. I also explain the questions they should be asking any provider and how they should be engaged in making sure that their providers provide better service and correct any incorrect information.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 5:32:55 AM
Re: How will they know?
"I think the only concern is the misconception that the good 'ol way of pen & paper is more 'secure' than digital"

@pcharles09: I think more than security, people are concerned about the privacy issue when it comes to EHR. Most people try to relate whatever technology they interact with to an existing technology. When it comes to EHR, a lot of people might relate it to social media because that's very common. They know their pictures and content that they put on social media is secure but they also know that anyone can view it. Hence, the fear that they feel with EHR for the information to get leaked out is natural.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 5:29:19 AM
Re: Storage Costs and Retrieval
"I know of a healthcare organization that keeps paper records and duplicates the information electronically, which doesn't seem too logical to me."

@freespiritny25: I think they may be doing that as a pressure from different stakeholders. Having the information stored electronically may be a requirement from the authorities while their patients would be more comfortable with the paper records. To please both stakeholders, they might be caught in the middle and be forced to maintain the information in both forms.
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